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The best cheap 4K TVs you can buy

You don't have to spend big on a sharp-looking TV.
By
May 14, 2022

In 2022, it’s a real challenge to find a 1080p TV over 40 inches — 4K is the new standard. Thankfully, prices for 4K sets have dropped considerably in the past few years, and there are solid options from all the major vendors. Here are our picks for the best cheap 4K TVs you can get.

See also: 4K vs 1080p

We’ve limited the TVs covered here to $600 or less. Be aware that the cheaper you go, the more likely it is you’ll have to compromise on screen size.

The best cheap 4K TVs:

Editor’s note: We’ll be sure to add to this list of the best cheap 4K TVs as we find new options in stock.


Insignia 55-inch Fire TV

A 2021 Insignia Fire TV

One of the best options for a cheap 4K TV is something based on Amazon’s Fire TV platform. As is normal for Fire devices, Insignia’s set comes with a voice remote, which you can use to control not just your TV but other Alexa-compatible devices. If you don’t know what to watch, you can ask your remote to find a genre and browse titles for hours.

This set comes with three HDMI ports, and supports HDR10. We’ve chosen 55 inches as a baseline, but you can upgrade to 65 or even 70 inches without breaking the $600 mark.

As a side note, always buy the latest model year of a Fire TV product. Budget products don’t always perform as well as they should, so it’s worth spending on the latest chips to minimize the risk.

See also: The best Amazon Fire TV apps


TCL 43-inch Roku TV or Android TV

tcl
Amazon

Roku and Android TV can be preferable platforms over Fire TV, especially if you don’t care about Alexa or Prime Video. Roku is famous for its simple UI, and voice search that makes it easy to compare prices (including free options) when you’re hunting for a movie or TV show. Android TV benefits from having Google Assistant built in, which means you can ask general knowledge questions, and control any Assistant-compatible smart home device, not just your TV.

For TCL we’ve chosen to link their Android 4-Series sets, which are HDR-capable and range from 43 inches to 75. You’ll have to choose 65 inches or less if you want to spend under $600, however.

See also: Which Roku streaming device is right for you


Toshiba 55-inch Fire TV

If Fire TV does sound appealing, Toshiba’s products have a few things going for them over other budget models. For one, the company includes four HDMI ports instead of the more common three. That sounds superfluous until you’ve got a soundbar, a console, and a third-party streaming device all connected at the same time, in which case that fourth port can offer some much-needed flexibility.

Toshiba also supports both HDR10 and Dolby Vision, the latter of which is the best HDR standard on the market, but relatively rare on cheap TVs. You can scale size anywhere between 43 and 65 inches while staying under $600.


Samsung 55-inch Class Crystal UHD AU8000

The Samsung Class Crystal AU8000 smart TV

Samsung TVs are well-known for their image quality, and there’s no exception with the Class Crystal line. One aspect of this is support for 120Hz refresh rates, whereas some other budget TVs are limited to 60Hz. That matters most when gaming, and indeed Class Crystal includes an automatic game mode that both optimizes output and minimizes lag.

The company does rely on the Tizen platform, which reduces app support. It’ll still get the job done, though, and you can alternately use Alexa, Google Assistant, or Samsung Bixby on the included voice remote. You’ll have to stick to 55 inches or less if you want a budget price tag.

See also: Here are the best Samsung smart TV apps to download


Vizio 55-inch V-Series TV

cheap 4k tv vizio v series
Amazon

Vizio uses a proprietary OS with no voice assistant, but you can turn to AirPlay, Google Cast, or a third-party streamer as a workaround, and you’re getting plenty of bang for your buck in other areas. There’s a Samsung-style Auto Game Mode, and HDR support includes Dolby Vision and HDR10 Plus. HDR10 Plus advances on its predecessor with the option of per-frame adjustments, although videos must specifically support that technology.

More importantly, you can get all of this in sets ranging from 43 to 75 inches, and you’ll slip under $600 if you choose 65.

See also: The best TV deals


LG 55-inch NanoCell 80 TV

The LG NanoCell 80 TV

LG’s webOS is proprietary, but surprisingly decent and well-supported. It’s worth a try even if you end up using AirPlay, Google Cast, or a dedicated streamer instead. The NanoCell 80 has Alexa and Google Assistant too, and there are four HDMI ports for any add-on devices.

Like Samsung, LG has a reputation for image quality, so that may be the NanoCell 80’s main attraction despite its HDR support being limited to HDR10 (or HLG in some regions). You’ll have to choose 50 or 55 inches to remain under $600.

sony x80j tv
Amazon

Sony’s X80K only slots under $600 at the 43-inch mark, but it could be the best budget option at that size. On top of an excellent image, its HDR compatibility extends up to Dolby Vision, and it’s based on Google TV, a more recent and generally superior incarnation of Android TV. While only Google Assistant is built in, Alexa or AirPlay control is available via third-party devices.

It additionally offers a Game Mode and four HDMI ports. It’s such a nice package that it might be worth spending a little more to get a 50-inch version.


Hisense 55-inch U6G TV

The Hisense U6G TV

You’re stuck with 50 or 55 inches if you want to stay in-budget, but the U6G is an Android TV with optional external Alexa control, so it has some of the same flexibility as Sony’s set. The main selling point here is quantum dot technology, which delivers OLED-like color and contrast on a cheaper LCD panel. Sadly, there’s no such thing as a budget OLED TV at this point.

Appropriately the U6G offers Dolby Vision HDR. Hisense even claims Dolby Atmos sound, though you won’t get much dimensionality to your audio without external speakers.