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A Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro displays a fitness-centric watch face.
Kaitlyn Cimino / Android Authority

The TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro is a powerful smartwatch that deserves better than an outdated Wear OS

Key upgrades to the user experience keep Mobvoi's smartwatch line attractive, but there's a Wear OS elephant in the room.
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Published onJune 25, 2024

Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro

The TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro offers small but useful upgrades worthy of a half-generation model, combining impressive durability with a speedy user experience and Mobvoi's unique dual-display. However, without the latest Wear OS on board (and a newer version on the horizon), the newest TicWatch lacks the best software platform to match its great hardware.

What we like

Dual display is fantastic
Updated digital crown
Improved durability
Same snappy performance

What we don't like

Doesn’t run the latest Wear OS
No wireless charging
Only available in one size
No LTE model

Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro

The TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro offers small but useful upgrades worthy of a half-generation model, combining impressive durability with a speedy user experience and Mobvoi's unique dual-display. However, without the latest Wear OS on board (and a newer version on the horizon), the newest TicWatch lacks the best software platform to match its great hardware.

The TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro is a new addition to Mobvoi’s ever-growing smartwatch lineup. As a fan of the previous model, the TicWatch Pro 5, I was eager to test the new device and see what improvements Mobvoi had in store. Unfortunately, in terms of advancing the TicWatch family, the device represents more of a half-step than a new generation (hinted at by the device’s naming structure).

Rather than a complete overhaul, the Pro 5 Enduro brings key refinements to the user experience while leaving some shortcomings unresolved. Most significantly, it’s still running an outdated version of Wear OS.

Design tweaks for adventuring

A Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro user checks their workout stats on the device's secondary display.
Kaitlyn Cimino / Android Authority

At first glance, the TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro looks a lot like the regular TicWatch Pro 5. It offers sleek lines undisrupted by excessive pushers and an impactful, oversized impression without being too bulky. The new model has an arrowed pattern to its barely raised bezel that’s said to improve durability and also just looks cool. It’s also slightly thinner than its predecessor by about 0.3 mm (a difference I did feel on my wrist).

Mobvoi swapped out the Pro 5’s flat matte band for a textured design that’s subtle yet elegant looking and plenty comfortable. I found the ridging on the back helped airflow during workouts rather than trapping sweat like other flat bands. It stood up well during gym sessions and yard work, and while I helped build sets for children’s play, fortunately, washing clean of the paint it acquired.

True to its new moniker, the TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro boasts improved durability specs compared to the regular TicWatch Pro 5.

More importantly, the strap isn’t the only durable feature of the Enduro. While Mobvoi didn’t increase water resistance from 50ATM, it did add Sapphire Crystal glass to protect the dual-layered display I adore, with one OLED panel for the smartwatch part, and an Ultra Low Power LCD for the basics when not in active use. Though not revolutionary by any means, Sapphire glass is always a welcome addition to any watch line because arms are an exposed appendage. This is the type of durability improvement I expect to see on a device with a moniker like “Enduro.”

The Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro features an improved digital crown design.
Kaitlyn Cimino / Android Authority

Meanwhile, the Enduro also upgrades the digital crown originally added to the line just last year. The new model’s rotating crown is slightly larger and stronger, making it easier to use during workouts (or while wearing gardening gloves). I was thrilled about this addition to the previous model, as it improved on-device navigation drastically. Seeing Mobvoi further refine the design tells me the company isn’t just checking boxes; they actually care about users’ experience. As before, the crown makes exploring menus and data screens a breeze, but now the input and onscreen scrolling are even smoother.

Over on the back of the device, the watch is largely unchanged from the TicWatch Pro 5. Users will find the same sensors and charging pins as well as the ability to quick-release straps for mixing up your look. I would have loved to see wireless charging added to the lineup to raise Mobvoi to Samsung’s level, but that’s mostly because my pipe dream is for all smartwatches to standardize charging. Some day!

A smartwatch that lasts

A Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro rests alongside its charger.
Kaitlyn Cimino / Android Authority

Despite my dashed hopes for wireless charging, battery life is still one of the biggest highlights of the Enduro. The same 628mAh battery cell powers this model as the last, with the same Snapdragon W5+ Gen 1 operating system and the same 1.43-inch display. Like the Pro 5, the Enduro also utilizes Mobvoi’s unique Ultra Low Power display to mitigate battery consumption and offer users more hands-on use between charges. This translated to just over 4 days of use before I needed to plug in, including GPS workouts, mindless data scrolling, and regular notifications.

Battery life is one of the TicWatch 5 Pro Enduro's biggest strengths, thanks in large part to its secondary low power display.

These battery specs alone make the watch worth considering. Mobvoi’s dual display continues to impress me, leaving me wondering why other brands don’t opt for creative means of stretching power. The only other Wear OS device offering similar battery life is the OnePlus Watch 2 with its unique dual-chip architecture. Maybe the answer is simply, “two is better than one.”

Health and fitness tracking headed in the right direction

A Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro displays a user's stats in the TicHealth app.
Kaitlyn Cimino / Android Authority

When you open the TicWatch 5 Pro Enduro’s App library, you’ll still find an unruly number of preinstalled apps, including a handful of Tic-titled options. Of the superfluous apps, I will say I’ve come around to the treadmill one after reviewing a Mobvoi at-home walking treadmill. If you want to increase your step count in the laziest way possible, I highly recommend looking into one yourself. I now watch a lot less TV in a stationary position. Meanwhile, the watch brings more sports to the Tic Exercise app, which you can reorder according to your priorities. I love this type of simple customization which helps the device feel tailored to my needs.

The Enduro also introduces a consolidated TicHealth app, which does a good job of organizing all your tracked data on device. Users won’t find as much advanced data as you will on a platform like Garmin, but there is more than enough for basic health activity tracking. I found my stats mostly agreed with my Apple Watch, though occasionally the step count wasn’t always synced immediately. 

A GPS map shows a route recorded by a Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro compared to an Apple Watch Ultra 2.

Even the device’s GPS kept up fairly well with my Apple Watch Ultra 2, recording nearly identical total distances and routes. The map above represents one exception recorded during a run on a cloudy evening. The Enduro’s route deviated from the Ultra 2’s more than on other runs, though not by very much, occasionally dipping into yards.

Finally, if you opt for third-party fitness tracking apps, the Enduro now supports those apps on its low-power screen, allowing you to view data without draining extra battery mid-workout. As I mentioned above, I love Mobvoi’s clever secondary screens. Just like on the Pro 5, I can view my color-coded heart rate zones at a glance as well as a handful of other key metrics without fully unlocking.

Wear OS woes

A Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro rests among alternative smartwaches.
Kaitlyn Cimino / Android Authority

With an incredibly powerful processor, a durable design, and a handful of accurate sensors, the TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro is an attractive Wear OS device. What holds it back is outdated software. The watch launched running Wear OS 3.5 even though Wear OS 4 has been available to other brands since the end of 2023. What’s worse, Mobvoi users have a history of endlessly waiting on expected software, only to get stuck in beta programs. Meanwhile, any Wear OS fan can flip their calendar and recognize that Wear OS 5 is headed our way very soon (looking at you, Samsung), which will leave the Enduro even further behind.

Outdated software continues to hold Mobvoi back in the race against competitors like Samsung and Google.

That isn’t to say that Wear OS 3.5 doesn’t offer a very good user experience. Thanks to its Qualcomm processor, the watch offers one of the smoothest experiences available. I can access the Google Play Store to load up on third-party apps or utilize turn-by-turn directions via Google Maps. I can also set up a pin and use Google Wallet to make quick purchases (like gas station snacks to reward myself for stopping for fuel). However, users won’t find Google Assistant on board like you will on other leading Wear OS devices, nor any other tools or features introduced in the latest update. When Wear OS 5 lands this summer, it’s extremely unlikely this device will leapfrog the current platform, leaving users waiting for an upgrade to software that’s already been replaced.

Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 review: Waiting on Wear OS 4

A Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro displays a standard watch face.
Kaitlyn Cimino / Android Authority

As much as this smartwatch offers much to like, it’s hard to look past the Wear OS elephant in the room. If you already own the TicWatch Pro 5, I can’t see anyone needing to lay out the cash for a new model. Many of the new device’s biggest strengths — its dual display, incredible battery life, and digital crown navigation — can already be found on the older watch, and the cosmetic upgrades don’t outweigh the lack of new software.

If you don’t already own a recent Wear OS watch, the Enduro is a more attractive buy, especially if the idea of charging up daily makes you cringe. Neither the Pixel Watch 2 nor Samsung’s top models offer as much battery life. Plus, the dual display doesn’t just save juice; it also functions really well during workouts.

Neither the Pixel Watch 2 nor Samsung's top models offer as much battery life as the TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro.

You might want to check out the original TicWatch Pro 5 ($349 at Amazon) before you look to the Enduro, as it often goes on sale for a very good price. That said, the TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro costs $349.99, which is a fairly average price point for a Wear OS device. It’s available in a single colorway, Obsidian, and a single 48mm case size. If you don’t fancy large wristwear, it might not be for you, but I found it really comfortable even on my small arm. If you are an iOS user, it’s definitely not for you, as it’s only compatible with Android phones.

Assuming neither of those concerns apply, the real question is whether your priority is to access the best software available or tap into the best battery life. For Mobvoi’s sake, I hope shoppers don’t always have to choose. The TicWatch family deserves a fantastic platform to match the great hardware.

Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro
Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro
Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 Enduro
Dual display is fantastic • Updated digital crown • Improved durability
MSRP: $349.99
A long-lasting Wear OS smartwatch for the outdoors.
With a focus on fitness features for the outdoor enthusiast, the Mobvoi TicWatch 5 Pro Enduro is a sleek, yet rugged, Wear OS smartwatch with big battery life and newly simplified health tracking.
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