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How to claim your payout from the MacBook keyboard settlement

Apple's keyboard redesign didn't go as planned.
By
January 5, 2023

In late 2022, Apple agreed to a $50 million payout fund to settle a class-action lawsuit over faulty “butterfly” keyboards in older MacBook models. If you were affected, you may be able to claim up to $395 — read on to see if you’re eligible and how to claim a possible payout.

Who is eligible to claim the settlement?

The settlement applies to “all persons and entities in the United States” who bought a MacBook, MacBook Air, or MacBook Pro with a butterfly switch keyboard between 2015 and 2019. Apple ultimately reverted to conventional keyboard switches after numerous complaints about sticky or unresponsive keys.

There are three different groups of class members, the first (Group 1) being people who had to replace their entire keyboard (i.e. get a “topcase replacement”) two or more times. They should get an email or postcard notifying them of eligibility, and may get up to $395 after confirming their mailing address.

The other two groups consist of people who tried to replace their keyboard or keycaps and still suffered problems. They need to submit a claim form, and can only get a max of $125 if they replaced their keyboard, or up to $50 if they replaced keycaps.

Note also that you only qualify if repairs/replacements were performed within four years of purchase, and by Apple or an Apple-authorized service provider. All claims must be submitted by 11:59PM Pacific time on March 6, 2023.

How to claim the MacBook keyboard settlement

An Apple MacBook Pro keyboard and touch bar

People in Group 1 should visit keyboardsettlement.com and confirm or update their mailing address using the Change of Address form. Once that’s done, a check should be sent out sometime after a March 16 approval hearing unless appeals stretch things out further. Actual payouts could fall below $395, at least partly depending on the number of claimants.

Members of Groups 2 and 3 are required to submit a claim form, attesting that they got a repair but issues went unresolved. If Apple doesn’t already have a record of your MacBook purchase and repair(s), you’ll need to submit your own evidence.

Be sure you visit the correct website. Scammers will sometimes try to exploit class action suits.


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