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This small magnetic power bank from Anker is a big game changer

Made for iPhones, works with Android too.
By
February 1, 2023
Two white Anker 622 Magnetic Batteries on a table next to a Pixel 6 Pro with a Moment (M) Force case
Rita El Khoury / Android Authority

Choosing a power bank to charge your phone on the go isn’t easy. Between the different brands, charging powers, and battery capacities, the choices are endless. But sometimes, a product stands out from the rest because it is so obvious and simple that we can’t help but wonder why we had to wait this long for it.

The Anker 622 Magnetic Battery ($69.99) fits that bill. I’ve had two of these for about a year now, and they’ve become essential additions to both my everyday pouch and travel backpack. The reason is simple: They’re compact, light, and simply convenient.

Anker has a released a new, more powerful version of this magnetic power bank, the Anker 633 Magnetic Battery ($79.99). It has a metallic kickstand, a 10,000mAh battery, faster 20W USB-C input/output, and an additional USB-A port that can output up to 18W of power. All three charging methods can be used at the same time too (wireless, USB-C, and USB-A), making it a better buy overall.

The Anker 622 houses a 5,000mAh battery with Qi wireless as well as USB-C charging — a single USB-C port can be used for both input and output (up to 10W in my tests). On the back, there’s an invisible kickstand that allows you to prop your phone in portrait or landscape. But where Anker goes the extra mile is by adding a ring of MagSafe-compatible magnets on the front, to better align your phone with the Qi coil and charge more efficiently.

This magnetic power bank works with Android phones too if you use a MagSafe adapter or a magnetic case.

To address the elephant in the room first, yes, the Anker 622 Magnetic Battery is obviously more adapted to recent iPhone models. But it does work on Android devices too if you use a compatible case or stick a magnetic MagSafe adapter to the back of your phone. Two of my colleagues here on Android Authority use it with their iPhones, while I have a Moment (M) Force case ($49) on my Pixel 6 Pro, Pixel 7, and Pixel 7 Pro that lets me attach the battery magnetically.

White Anker 622 Magnetic Battery attached to a Pixel 6 Pro with a Moment (M) Force case
Rita El Khoury / Android Authority

Unlike big bulky 20,000mAh power banks, I can slip this one in my jeans pocket or my small purse/clutch. When I need it, it attaches to my phone and charges it — no cables necessary. I can still use my Pixel 7 Pro or 6 Pro while they’re charging, without having to worry about dangling or tangling cables. Then when I’m done, both the Pixel and the power bank go back into my pocket or purse to continue charging. And if I ever need to watch some videos or read some news, I can prop it up on a flat surface while it fills up.

I just bring my phone near the power bank and let the magnets do their thing. Snap, done.

The simplicity of magnets and wireless charging is why I keep coming back to this despite owning many other more powerful portable batteries. I can’t overstate how “mindless” it is to juice up my phone by just bringing the power bank near it and letting the magnet do its thing. That’s why I love this MagSafe accessory ecosystem. I don’t think about alignments or plugging and unplugging. Snap, done.

However, you have to lower your charging expectations a bit here. The Anker 622’s Qi output is significantly slower and less efficient than wired charging. In my tests, phones like the Galaxy S22 Plus, Pixel 6 Pro and 7 Pro, and the OnePlus 9 all received about 2-3W of power in normal conditions (i.e. when they weren’t completely depleted). A full battery on the power bank was able to charge a Galaxy S22 Plus from 0 to 68% before it died. This is clearly more suited for on-the-go top-ups than as your only solution on a weekend camping trip.

Qi charging is slower and less efficient, but it's incredibly convenient.

If you want faster charging or if you don’t want to lose a lot of capacity through wireless transfer, you’ll have to carry the USB-C cable. That provides up to 10W of power and can get the Galaxy S22 Plus up to 90-95%.

Two white Anker 622 Magnetic Batteries on a table, one of them is not visible because it's charging a Pixel 6 Pro in a Moment (M) Force case
Rita El Khoury / Android Authority

For me, the Anker 622 is perfect when I’m out for a whole day and I know I’ll be using Google Maps, taking photos, and reading news, in addition to my regular WhatsApp, Gmail, Slack, Chrome, and Spotify usage. It’s also a good option to slip in my purse when I’m about to go out for dinner and I realize I only have 30% of charge left on my phone.

But if I were splurging on a magnetic power bank for my Android phones today, I’d get the more powerful Anker 633 I mentioned earlier. It’s the 622’s successor and fixes many of its minor issues. Double the capacity, double the wired charging speed, an extra output port — all of these are excellent improvements. You lose a bit in portability, though, as it’s thicker (18.15mm versus 12.8mm). Still, the 633 seems like the perfect balance between a traditional power bank and the more portable magnetic ones.

$59.37 at Amazon
Anker 622 Magnetic Battery
Anker 622 Magnetic Battery
Compact and portable
MagSafe compatibility
Pop-up stand
$79.99 at Amazon
Anker 633 Magnetic Battery
Anker 633 Magnetic Battery
MagSafe compatibility
Sturdy stand
Powerful output

At their original MSRP of $70-80 (though sometimes discounted), the Anker 622 or 633 Magnetic Battery have a relatively low milliampere/hour-to-dollars ratio. They cost a hefty penny for the small’ish capacity and serviceable charging speeds. But what Anker is selling here is convenience, portability, and simplicity. And if you’re willing to pay a premium for those, then you will love the 622 or 633.

Same brand, at home charging: Anker 637 Magnetic Charging Station review