Update: May 29, 2019 at 4:30 p.m. ET: Google issued a formal response to Android Police on the removal of the Eaze and Weedmaps apps from the Google Play Store:

These apps simply need to move the shopping cart flow outside of the app itself to be compliant with this new policy. We’ve been in contact with many of the developers and are working with them to answer any technical questions and help them implement the changes without customer disruption.

We will update this article as we learn more.


Original article: May 29, 2019 at 2:37 p.m. ET: Even though selling and consuming marijuana is legal in several states across the U.S., Android Police reported today that Google changed its content policy to forbid apps that facilitate the sale of the green stuff.

According to Google, common violations of the aforementioned content policy change include the following:

  • Allowing users to order marijuana through an in-app shopping cart feature
  • Assisting users in arranging delivery or pick-up of marijuana
  • Facilitating the sale of products containing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)

Note that the policy change doesn’t forbid apps from promoting the use of marijuana. That said, Google might be targeting popular apps Weedmaps and Eaze with the policy change.

Editor's Pick

Weedmaps lets you order recreational marijuana from dispensaries and have it delivered in the U.S., Canada, Europe, and anywhere else where marijuana is medically or recreationally regulated. You can also located a nearby doctor to get a medical recommendation on whether you can use marijuana for medical purposes.

Meanwhile, Eaze connects users with local dispensaries to have legal marijuana delivered to them. The app is currently only serves cities in California and Oregon.

The change makes sense from Google’s perspective, seeing how the company is trying to make the Play Store more kid-friendly. Medical or recreational marijuana use has either been decriminalized or legalized in most U.S. states, though consumption by minors remains illegal.

As such, there’s a possibility that Google boots Weedmaps and Eaze from the Play Store sooner than later. Android Authority reached out to both Weedmaps and Eaze, but didn’t receive a response by press time.

NEXT: Google Play Store notifying users of installed-but-unused apps

Comments
Read comments