According to a new report, BOE is the latest display manufacturer to significantly expand its OLED production, in the hopes of replacing Samsung as Apple’s main supplier.

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As you may know, the mobile OLED market is a highly lucrative one, dominated by Samsung, the South Korean conglomerate. Samsung’s OLED displays, which date back to pre-Android era, are visibly more advanced than panels made by companies like LG, and combined with the company’s capacity for mass production, it’s no surprise that it was chosen as the sole OLED supplier for the iPhone X. Seeing the astronomical profit Samsung is making from supplying OLED panels to Apple, other companies want in on the action too, it seems.

Around two months ago, we reported that Japan Display was looking to secure $900 million for a new OLED production method, all in an attempt to dethrone Samsung in the world of mobile OLED displays, and now, the latest rumor claims BOE is also taking steps to capture Apple’s attention. China’s largest display manufacturer, BOE will reportedly dedicate its B11 line in Sichuan and B12 line, which is currently in an investment process, to producing OLED panels for Apple.

The Chinese company plans to invest a whopping $7.04 billion into B11 alone, and during its event last month, BOE showcased an OLED display housed in an iPhone X-like body.

ET News states that for B11, 70 percent of all OLED displays will be flexible panels and the other 30 percent will be foldable panels. For B12, it will be evenly split between the two types of panels. The Chinese company plans to invest a whopping $7.04 billion into B11 alone, and during its event last month, BOE showcased an OLED display housed in an iPhone X-like body – another not-so-subtle love call aimed at Apple.

While it’s unlikely that the emergence of other companies like BOE and Japan Display will have a serious impact on Samsung, it may be more of a worrisome issue for LG. The South Korean electronics company has slowly been moving away from LCD displays and expanding its OLED business to small- and medium-sized panels. Unfortunately, not only is it facing tough competition from other multibillion dollar companies, but its current OLED panels (found on devices like the V30 and Pixel 2 XL) are plagued by quality issues. Indeed, all of this may spell trouble for its plans to secure a deal with Apple.

Having said that, the rapidly growing competition amongst the late comers in the mobile OLED market, which has long been monopolized by Samsung, is a welcome change, in my opinion.