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AT&T Mobility chief says we shouldn't get too excited about 5G technology quite yet

In response to Verizon's early 5G testing claims, AT&T Mobility chief Glenn Lurie says we shouldn't get too excited quite yet.
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September 14, 2015
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Just last week Verizon told us it would begin testing its 5G network sometime in 2016, with a potential rollout slated for 2017. Many folks in the industry have said this is much sooner than the purported 2020 rollout that many have talked about in the past, especially because we aren’t entirely sure what 5G means quite yet.

But now that Verizon is doing its best to get consumers hyped up on the new technology, AT&T says we shouldn’t get too excited quite yet. According to AT&T Mobility CEO Glenn Lurie at CITA last week, in response to Verizon’s early 5G claims:

We’re not at a point to be making promises or commitments to customers as to what 5G is. We as an industry have been really good at overpromising and underdelivering when it comes to new technology.

AT&T’s contention regarding these claims is that 5G technology is still in its infancy, and not many folks in the industry can agree on what it looks like yet. “Let’s make sure that before we start hyping what it’s going to be, that those standards are agreed to,” Lurie went on to tell CNET. It should be noted that back in 2008, Verizon began testing its 4G network before AT&T began its testing. AT&T raised similar concerns back then, as well.

In response to AT&T’s comments, a Verizon spokesman told CNET:

Innovation happens when you’re willing to look at things a little differently than others, and you’re willing to put in the hard work to make your vision a reality.
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Industry leaders such as Verizon, Ericsson, Nokia, Qualcomm and others have been doing their part to bring 5G to the masses, though it will be some time before we see a wide rollout of the technology. What are your thoughts? Do you think Verizon needs to stop the hype train, or should we be excited about this new technology coming to our devices in the next two years or so?