Xiaomi: past, present & future

by: Edgar CervantesSeptember 10, 2015
1.2K

xiaomi-logo

Xiaomi is taking the world by storm. Only five years after its inception, the Chinese smartphone manufacturer has managed to take the #1 spot in its home country, as well as the #5 spot in the world (according to the IDC). Their smartphones go out of stock within minutes wherever they are made available, which makes it no surprise that they managed to sell $61 million handsets in 2014. And these numbers are not going down, as their growth is estimated at 30% in 2015. Valued at $46 billion, Xiaomi has been called the most valuable tech startup in the world.

How did a tiny little Chinese startup manage to blow up like this in only five years, beating plenty of veterans that have been around for generations? Xiaomi is now a leader in the industry, and they were part of our post on Chinese manufacturers to keep an eye on. It’s time to give you the rundown of their past, present and future. Let’s jump into all the details.

In the beginning

Xiaomi’s founding dates back to April 6th, 2010, when the startup was created by eight partners, including ex-Kingsoft CEO Lei Jun. Their initial plan didn’t really include building smartphones (at least that’s what publicly available info tells us). Instead, Xiaomi’s focus was making a ROM that would soon become one of the most popular in the world – MIUI.

banner-international-galaxy-s3-ice-cream-sandwich-romaur-miui-120913

Though based on Android, the MIUI ROM was highly associated with Apple’s software. The interface was simple, there was no app drawer and icons were playfully colorful. It also touted interesting features that other ROMs lacked, including its own app store, an enticing music player and even cloud backup. It was a breath of fresh air and people absolutely loved it.

As of February 2015, Xiaomi has over 100 million MIUI users. This is definitely nothing to scoff at, and it’s true testimony of the company’s success.

Then there was hardware

Xiaomi simply wasn’t satisfied with its success in the software world; it came to a point when the company also wanted to make its own hardware. And so the Chinese startup jumped into this industry with both feet in. In 2011, the company launched the Xiaomi Mi 1. This device became the first Xiaomi smartphone to sell in record times. It took only 34 hours for the company to go out of stock (pretty much every Xiaomi product sells out in seconds, nowadays).

mi_one_s_xiaomi

This Mi 1 had a Qualcomm Snapdragon S3 processor, 1 GB of RAM, a 4-inch 854 x 480 display, 8MP/2MP cameras and a 1930 mAh battery. To put things into perspective, we named the Samsung Galaxy S2 the best phone of 2011, and the Korean device wasn’t really that much better than the Mi 1. Where Xiaomi beat everyone (and still does) is the price, though. The Xiaomi Mi 1 costed 1999 Yuan, which currently equals to about $314 USD. Those prices were unheard of back then!

To take over the world, you must conquer the internet

So how did Xiaomi manage to go from nothing to becoming one of the biggest tech manufacturers in the world, in just a matter of a few years? For starters, the company makes great-looking devices, puts great hardware in them and undercuts the competition in pricing. The value they offer is nearly unbeatable, even by major manufacturers. The real question is – how do they manage to make their products so cheap?

No, this is not only because Xiaomi is a Chinese company. The startup was also among the first to adopt a more modern business strategy that has put it ahead of competitors. First, Xiaomi is focusing on long-term profits, not immediate gratification. They don’t make too much cash from their sales, instead they aim to reach a wider audience, strengthen their brand and build a foundation for future profits.

xiaomi-mi-4i-16

Another important factor is that Xiaomi keeps very tight control on its stock. They always have a much higher demand than supply, which is why units sell out in a matter of minutes every single time. They are never sitting on unsold products, so there’s no need to worry about losses or overstocked devices.

Lastly, the Chinese phone maker highly depends on social media and word of mouth for its advertising needs. You won’t see their product ads in TV, billboards or magazines, which cost a fortune to promote your brand on. Instead, they harness the power of the internet and transfer those millions in savings to you.

Multiple companies have adopted Xiaomi’s business model since then. One of them happens to be OnePlus, another very popular Chinese startup. Even Chinese tech giants like Huawei, ZTE, and Lenovo have swallowed their pride and launched unabashed Xiaomi clones, in the form of sub-brands like Honor, Axon, and ZUK.

Where Xiaomi now stands

As mentioned above, Xiaomi is currently no small player. They are #1 in China and #5 in the world, which is no small feat for a startup. And today they are doing better than ever. Expectations to increase sales by 30% in 2015 don’t seem unrealistic, considering the company has already moved 34.7 million smartphones during the first half of 2015. They are on their way to becoming a technology powerhouse, and certainly have the necessary weapons at their disposal.

xiaomi mi4 first impressions aa (8 of 13)

Xiaomi is by no means scared of entering new markets, and so far they have been successful in all their endeavors. Their smartphone business is thriving. Affordable devices like the Redmi Note 2 and Mi 4i happen to offer amazing value. Higher-end handsets like the Mi Note Pro and Mi 4 do the same, while also providing top-of-the-line performance. Xiaomi has also proven to be a main player in the wearable market. The Mi Pad competes only with the best of the best, but costs only about $200. The company also makes TVs, power banks, headphones and even air purifiers.

Entering new markets

An announcement hit the interwebs on August 2013, letting us know former Google Android team member Hugo Barra was to join Xiaomi as vice president of product management. This move was said to help the company expand into new markets. And so the preparations began.

We know these guys are here to stay, but what will the future hold for them? If Xiaomi is good at anything, it is at being patient. They will always wait for the right time to make any move, but be sure they are also adamant about their expansion.

One of the main factors holding Xiaomi back is availability, which is why the startup plans to enter new markets soon. They are currently dipping their toes into western waters by launching official accessory stores in the US, UK, Germany and France.

Hugo Barra Xiaomi -3
Don’t get overly excited, though. Hugo Barra was quick to say that they are taking it easy on US device launches, as Americans have different needs, purchasing habits and different carrier models. The company would first need to address those factors, so they are not rushing to bring their main products here just yet. Right now it’s all about brand awareness.

Xiaomi does want to take its business to another country in the Americas, though. They want to pierce into Latin America by first conquering Brazil. In addition, a new partnership with Leadcore may signal Xiaomi supplying its own chipset, and rumors suggest they even have plans for making a laptop.

Xiaomi in the future

Some say Xiaomi is the “next big thing”, while others claim it’s “China’s Apple”. The truth is it’s neither, and we must give them credit for that. Their business and pricing model is nothing like Apple’s, Samsung’s or any other manufacturer’s. Some of their devices might have certain similarities to others, but a Xiaomi product is hard to be mistaken.

xiaomi-mi-4i-8

It is companies like Xiaomi that are changing the way we look at technology. This is why I don’t see them going anywhere, at least anytime soon. The startup sure has its complications, but I feel like these are being taken into account by Xiaomi. Only time will tell, but so far it all seems to point towards a successful future for Xiaomi.

What do you think? Will Xiaomi raise to the top and compete more closely against the big guys? Will they just get stuck at some point? Hit the comments and share your thoughts!

Hot Xiaomi videos!

  • Teddy Beyrouthy

    Hate all chineese manufacters and xiaomi is on the top of the list

    • Airyl

      Ah, hate for the sake of hating something. How I love reading these types of idiotic posts and laughing at them.

      • Hugo Barra

        It’s name says all.

        • Hugo Barra

          His*

    • devilreaper

      HATERS GONNA HATE

    • s2weden2000

      change that to the faPple …

    • china rules

      and what phone are you using? i bet it was manufactured in china. if not there will be atleast 1 part in it that is made in china.

      • criminal china

        There’s a BIG difference between a non-Chinese brand just using China for cheap manufacturing vs. a Chinese brand.

        A Chinese manufacturer that assembles a foreign product is under strict quality control specifications dictated by that foreign company.

        A Chinese company however observes little to no quality control standards. Which is why in China you have “food” that’s not really food, poisoned baby and pet foods, poor quality products that kill people, etc.

        It’s a well known fact the Chinese have little regard for quality.

        • nsa sucks

          sad that murica doesn’t have advanced manufacturing facility like china. every american company depend on them. in the end all the money goes to china.

          if i want to go by your comment. murica have a very bad history of slavery, illegal spying on other countries in the name of nsa, kill children in Afghanistan and Vietnam, only country to use nuclear weapon.

          it is a well known fact that there is not a single quality technology that is manufactured in murica.

          if you are passionate about your own country then try using a phone manufactured in your country. i bet it will suck in quality. after Germany and japan, china is now no.3 for quality products. its the plain truth. 2014 – over billion phones manufactured in china. you are using one made in china, your mom,dad uses one made in china and your child will use one made in china.

          • China sux

            This is the funniest comment I’ve read in my entire life.

            America is the one who gave you the manufacturing facilities idiot.

            China is the world’s bitch. Every manufacturing capability in China was GIVEN by foreign countries, and you delude yourself and lie that it’s a Chinese accomplishment? What a joke.

            Without the world to steal from and give you manufacturing capabilities, you Chinese would be backwards, uncivilized scum. Wait, you still are.

        • Airyl

          I love it when people like you haven’t done enough research but try to prove a point anyway. Xiaomi’s phones are all manufactured in Foxconn, the exact same manufacturer that makes iPhones and iPads.

  • Clippoz

    It’s not easy for Xiaomi to enter the US market, not only because of the carriers..but is a matter of Certifications and standard.
    The US market is one of the most difficult market ever if you want to sell something (i face this problem almost everyday)
    UL certification for starters..only that can make people cry..a crapload of paperworks and a crapload of money to pay for every single project (phones in this case) that you want to introduce there.
    Than you have the SAR levels Xiaomi is not really in the correct zone for US tollerance
    Just this two reason are enough to make Xiaomi think if is actually a good move to enter the market directly…Failing in US will be a super huge impact on the company…
    Time to time folks..we will get there…Xiaomi will go world wide soon..just not now.. :D

  • Igy Tech

    2600/1800/800 mhz 4G for Europe and I would buy it.

    • gg

      I really hate the fact that those bands (especially band 20) are not supported. Chinese phones ftw!

  • mrjayviper

    how about sales figures and not just market share?

  • Latheryin

    One of their biggest issues I see in entering the states will be copyright issues. As long as they keep copying other OEMs they will have to offer make some changes before they will be successful.

  • mellowyellow

    This article reads like a propaganda piece with so much false information like the newspapers I read in China.

    It’s disillusioning to see intelligent writers promote junk like this from a terrorist country. The only alternative would be they were paid by the Chinese. It’s a very common Chinese practice to post or pay people to post millions of fake positive comments about Chinese companies and Chinese government on websites around the world in order to manipulate public opinion. Look up the 50 Cent Army for one example.

    I’m a consultant at a large NY firm, and I spend a little more than half a year in Silicon Valley since that’s where most of my clients are, and a month in China yearly.

    That means I get a very good behind-the-scenes look into companies that do business with China. I interact with all parts of a company’s ecosystem. Business owners, logistics managers, bankers, attorneys, engineers, accountants you name it.

    The common belief everyone has? The Chinese are in general one of the worst, most unethical people around and they have no qualms about it. Here in Silicon Valley and NY, we have the lowest opinion of the Chinese from first hand experience.

    Of course we grin and bear with it just to get business moving, but everyone would rather not have anything to do with these classless criminals.

    • mellowyellow

      <—-Continued from before
      What the media covers is really only a small sample space of what I see when helping my clients protect
      themselves from the Chinese.

      The amount of Chinese hacking and corporate espionage I have seen is out of this world, and that's just me. My other colleagues encounter similar magnitudes of Chinese spying.

      You may already know that the Chinese hack our companies, government, and military, but most don't know they also hack our universities like Harvard, Stanford, Berkeley, Columbia to steal R&D.

      Most non-Chinese companies in Silicon Valley, and elsewhere I'm sure, are constantly paranoid about Chinese companies and employees because of constantly falling victim to Chinese corporate espionage. This happens too frequently here since there has been a giant influx of Chinese immigrants.

      On their own Chinese companies can not engineer or develop good products.

      That's why the Chinese have a rampant culture of copying and stealing. If that doesn't work, the Chinese Communist government forces foreign companies to divulge trade secrets or share intellectual property with all these criminal Chinese companies as a prerequisite to do business in China.

      Not only that, they'll use their puppet "legal system" to frivolously fine foreign companies billions of dollars, or economically hold them hostage in order to gain resources to create and fund copy cat competing products to undercut foreign companies and put them out of business.

      The puppet "court" in China is only for show since there is no true legal system. It's primary purpose is to manipulate or exploit foreign companies that want to do business in China, or to execute political enemies under the guise of "anti-corruption."

      The lawyers I meet explain that whenever you try to pursue companies in China for intellectual property theft, they will disappear and reopen shop somewhere else in a matter of weeks, making it nearly impossible to stop theft and counterfeiting.

      When we travel to China, our firm and clients follow a strict protocol to prevent any IP theft by the Chinese.
      Here's a good lay person article introducing the Chinese threat. http://www.entrepreneur.com/ar

      There is a daunting barrier to entry in technology, which takes years and years of R&D and capital investment. So how do you think the Chinese completely SKIPPED all of that?

      By stealing knowledge, the Chinese have been able to cheat their way into the global market.

      Another way these Chinese cheat their way into the global market is to use the billions of dollars earned selling counterfeits and fining foreign companies to eventually buy out established, but struggling, foreign companies.

      For example, Lenovo bought out IBM and Motorola. This is like a criminal using drug money to buy a legitimate business in
      order to appear clean.

      A lesser known way the Chinese try to trick consumers without investing any R&D is by illegally piggy-backing the supply chain established by NON-Chinese companies. This is how the Chinese can trick consumers into thinking that a Chinese product may
      uncharacteristically appear to be decent quality, when in reality the Chinese are piggy backing off the reputation of others.

      They can illegally piggy back off others because manufacturing capacities are unfortunately IN China. So the unscrupulous Chinese factory owners can very easily take the foreign blueprints, tweak the manufacturing process a little, and churn out replicas with minor alterations. They then sell these for half the price because there was no associated R&D cost, and the Chinese Communist government financially protects them.

      This is how various Chinese smartphone companies have been able to trick consumers, since most smartphone component sourcing is located in one city in China.

      Let alone the reasonable fact that Chinese products may contain backdoors for the Chinese Communist government to spy on
      users. Chinese companies like xiaomi have already been caught doing this. We need to avoid all Chinese products on principle because China is without a doubt our number 1 enemy despite heavy economic ties.

      China's already waged war against us on all fronts except an all out military war.

      No need for us to buy Chinese junk and fund their attacks against us.

      The Chinese have one of the worst ethics. This is not just my own "opinion," but the "opinion" held by every single client of mine and others who do business with the Chinese.

      If one person said this about the Chinese, I would chalk it up as anecdotal.
      When it's almost universal, then that's incriminating.

      • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

        “Chinese companies like xiaomi have already been caught doing this.”
        Proof + Valid sources, or else, please shut up for you are proving nothing.

        “China’s already waged war against us on all fronts except an all out military war.”
        Proof + Valid sources, or else, please shut up for you are proving nothing.

        “No need for us to buy Chinese junk and fund their attacks against us.”
        Proof + Valid sources, or else, please shut up for you are proving nothing.

        “If one person said this about the Chinese, I would chalk it up as anecdotal.When it’s almost universal, then that’s incriminating.”
        And so your final conclusion still has no relevance with Xiaomi being “evil” like China. Haha I hope you had fun wasting your two hours!

        • mellowyellow

          “Proof + Valid sources, or else, please shut up for you are proving nothing.”
          “Proof + Valid sources, or else, please shut up for you are proving nothing.”
          “Proof + Valid sources, or else, please shut up for you are proving nothing.”

          1. Ok, let me just break a couple of my NDA’s and tell you about sensitive and privileged client information.
          NOT.
          Even without revealing confidential information, you and everyone else in the world can easily Google a plethora of examples of rampant illegal Chinese actions.

          Thus again, your contrived and futile “intimidation” tactic demanding proof doesn’t work here kid, because simple Google searches take care of everything.

          So please shut up and sit down.

          2. “And so your final conclusion still has no relevance with Xiaomi being “evil” like China. Haha I hope you had fun wasting your two hours!”

          And so my final conclusions still is, if you don’t know how to read or think, please shut up and sit down.

          Here’s a free lesson on logical fallacies. All your comments were a STRAWMAN. HAHA

          You see kid, someone with a real brain can whip up what I wrote in less than 15 minutes, probably less than the amount of time you took to write up your useless diatribe. Haha I hope you had fun wasting all that energy “refuting” me for nothing.

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            …”because simple Google searches take care of everything.”

            Was that supposed to be funny? Because it certainly was for me. You cannot Google an article and say “I found valid sources”, every websites view on the topic is biased, in fact the whole internet is biased. Google “GMO’s” and you’ll find several articles saying that it’s good and and several articles saying it’s bad.

            “You see kid, someone with a real brain can whip up what I wrote in less than 15 minutes”

            But someone with a real brain wouldn’t waste their time trying to win an argument that was flawed from the start. But whatever, like I give two shits.

          • mellowyellow

            LOL You did give two shits! LOLOLOL HAHAHAH

            Thanks for proving to the whole world reading all this how intellectually inferior you are. LOLOL

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            LOL and you just did gave two shits too!

            Thanks for proving to the whole world reading all this how much you like to copy my comments.

          • mellowyellow

            I never said I don’t care, unlike like YOU! LOL

            Thanks for proving to the whole world you STILL can’t read. LOLOL

            Look at this Chinese kid. Not only does he copy my comments, now he accuses the original of copying! LOL True to his Chinese heritage!

      • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

        In my opinion, your arguments are flawed in every way. First you say that Xiaomi is propaganda, then instead of proving your argument, you go ahead and blame it on the Chinese gov’t.

        Xiaomi is a Chinese phone company, and has literally no correlation with politics. Just like how Apple is a US phone company, and yet the US President doesn’t even use an iPhone (but instead a BlackBerry).

        So please kindly take your political rubbish away as it respectively does not belong in the world of science and technology. We have no use for your insane brainwashed kind.

        • Latheryin

          While I agree with you for the most part. I would not dismiss the Chinese government connection, it was long rumored that a lot of the capital to start the company came from government sources. While it was never proven (that I know of) it is not really something you can dismiss completely.

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            The more important question is that are they still funding the government? Because with all these affordable phones, earphones, and other gadgets they are making, it looks like their focus is on the consumers only.

          • Latheryin

            How things look are never how they really are. So are they? No one can say for sure but it’s enough to have them banned for use by any US military personal. If they were truly focused on consumers they would not treat their users like they do to be honest. Either way it doesn’t really matter to me personally. I’ll never own one of their devices until they shape up

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            Doesn’t really matter to me either, but I’m still buying their products though, I just don’t care about the government and all that political nonsense. Never will take any part in political controversies and never cared to do so, I’m just a guy who loves technology.

          • Latheryin

            So do I but I also like security and some of the things found with their devices on top of being banned on owning one will make them not even a close option

          • This is why I avoid Apple products.

          • mellowyellow

            Don’t bother with or believe this kid.

            He’s a Chinese nationalist using the excuse of a technology-loving person to cover up all the dirty
            truths about China, just like how the 50 Cent Party works.

            I replied back to his flawed attempts to squash the dirty truth.
            He likes to pretend that politics and economy have no connection, but you and I know he’s severely wrong.

            Everything I said in my comments is 100% true and known by anyone who has done business with China, and he’s clearly bothered by that. Period.

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            “He’s a Chinese nationalist using the excuse of a technology-loving person to cover up all the dirty truths about China.”

            Lol and you are the most arrogant person I’ve ever argued with, people like you deserve to be ignored.

          • mellowyellow

            Lol, I love being arrogant. Proves people like you wrong.

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            …Which therefore proves both of us wrong.

          • mellowyellow

            Whatever you say kid!

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            Bye felicia!

          • mellowyellow

            So brilliant! Bye LOL

        • mellowyellow

          1. “In my opinion, your arguments are flawed in every way. First you say that Xiaomi is propaganda, then instead of proving your argument, you go ahead and blame it on the Chinese gov’t.”

          In my opinion, if you don’t know how to read, shut up and sit down.

          2. “Xiaomi is a Chinese phone company, and has literally no correlation with politics. Just like how Apple is a US phone company, and yet the US President doesn’t even use an iPhone (but instead a BlackBerry).”

          Again if you don’t know your facts, shut up and sit down.

          3. “So please kindly take your political rubbish away as it respectively does not belong in the world of science and technology. We have no use for your insane brainwashed kind.”

          I wonder who’s really brainwashed?
          The person who discussed well known truths of the corrupt Chinese people?
          OR,
          The butthurt Chinese keyboard warrior who can’t handle the truth about his country, and launches into a confused garble of gibberish in the desperate hopes of covering up the truth?

          So please kindly take your butthurt Chinese whining away as it respectively does not belong in
          a world of science, technology, and a little something called reality. We have no use for your brainwashed, criminal kind who can’t accept reality.

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            “In my opinion, if you don’t know how to read, shut up and sit down.”

            In MY opinion, you are a pretentious fool that deserves to be ignored. So shut up and GTFO.

          • mellowyellow

            Nobody cares about your opinion HAHA. So shut up and GTFO.

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            Never cared about your opinion in the first place, so you shouldn’t be the one talking.

          • mellowyellow

            LOL you are so obsessed with me!!!!!!!

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            IKR!!!!!

          • mellowyellow

            LOL

    • mellowyellow

      <—-Continued from before
      Another way these Chinese cheat their way into the global market is to use the billions of dollars earned selling counterfeits and fining foreign companies to eventually buy out established, but struggling, foreign companies.

      For example, Lenovo bought out IBM and Motorola. This is like a criminal using drug money to buy a legitimate business in
      order to appear clean.

      A lesser known way the Chinese try to trick consumers without investing any R&D is by illegally piggy-backing the supply chain established by NON-Chinese companies. This is how the Chinese can trick consumers into thinking that a Chinese product may
      uncharacteristically appear to be decent quality, when in reality the Chinese are piggy backing off the reputation of others.

      They can illegally piggy back off others because manufacturing capacities are unfortunately IN China. So the unscrupulous Chinese factory owners can very easily take the foreign blueprints, tweak the manufacturing process a little, and churn out replicas with minor alterations. They then sell these for half the price because there was no associated R&D cost, and the Chinese Communist government financially protects them.

      This is how various Chinese smartphone companies have been able to trick consumers, since most smartphone component sourcing is located in one city in China.

    • mellowyellow

      <—-Continued from before
      Not only that, they'll use their puppet "legal system" to frivolously fine foreign companies billions of dollars, or economically hold them hostage, in order to gain resources to create and fund copy cat products to undercut and bankrupt foreign companies.

      The puppet "court" in China is only for show since there is no true legal system. It's primary purpose is to manipulate or exploit foreign companies that want to do business in China, or to execute political enemies under the guise of "anti-corruption."

      The lawyers I meet explain that whenever you try to pursue companies in China for intellectual property theft, they will disappear and reopen shop somewhere else in a matter of weeks, making it nearly impossible to stop theft and counterfeiting.

      When we travel to China, our firm and clients follow a strict protocol to prevent any IP theft by the Chinese.
      Here's a good lay person article introducing the Chinese threat. http://www.entrepreneur.com/ar

      There is a daunting barrier to entry in technology, which takes years and years of R&D and capital investment. So how do you think the Chinese completely SKIPPED all of that?

      By stealing knowledge, the Chinese have been able to cheat their way into the global market.

      • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

        Without reading, I can still make out all those little fallacies. Any “Chinese gov’t” argument you try to pull out will be refuted when in conjunction with your thesis, because like I said, you can’t prove that fruits are vegetables without committing another logical fallacy.

        • mellowyellow

          Let me repeat myself. Rhinoceros, bitc*.

          If you don’t know how to read, shut up and sit down.

          Also, “logical fallacy?” Let me introduce you to my good friend Inigo Montoya
          http://i1.kym-cdn.com/entries/icons/original/000/010/692/19789999.jpg

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            LOLOL I love how you keep editing all your comments 10 minutes later to copy my style. LOL

            Too slow to think? LOL

            Thanks for proving your intellectual inferiority! LOL

          • mellowyellow

            Aww, the baby can dish it but can’t take it. Here’s some wipes for your butthurt face.

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            How original, bravo! I’m in tears.

            With laughter!

          • mellowyellow

            How original, bravo! I’m in tears.

            With laughter!

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            Wow kid, you really seem to be mentally challenged for copying my comments. Don’t cry however, it’s not the end of the world. You’re also going to be killed.

          • mellowyellow

            Thanks for the advice!

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            No problem!

          • mellowyellow

            LOL

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            What’s so funny?

          • mellowyellow

            LOLOL

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            Nice!!!

          • mellowyellow

            LOLOL I love how you keep editing all your comments 10 minutes later to copy my style. LOL What a predictable Chinese copycat.

            Too slow to think? LOL

            Thanks for proving your intellectual inferiority! LOL

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            Whatever helps you sleep at night, you silly child.

          • mellowyellow

            LOL

    • mellowyellow

      <—-Continued from before
      What the media covers is really only a small sample space of what I see when helping my clients protect
      themselves from the Chinese.

      The amount of Chinese hacking and corporate espionage I have seen is out of this world, and that's just me. My other colleagues encounter similar magnitudes of Chinese spying.

      You may already know that the Chinese hack our companies, government, and military, but most don't know they also hack our universities like Harvard, Stanford, Berkeley, Columbia to steal R&D.

      Most non-Chinese companies in Silicon Valley, and elsewhere I'm sure, are constantly paranoid about Chinese companies and employees because of constantly falling victim to Chinese corporate espionage. This happens too frequently here since there has been a giant influx of Chinese immigrants recently, but their spying isn't anything new.

      On their own Chinese companies can not engineer or develop good products.

      That's why the Chinese have a rampant culture of copying and stealing. If that doesn't work, the Chinese Communist government forces foreign companies to divulge trade secrets or share intellectual property with all these criminal Chinese companies as a prerequisite to do business in China.

      • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

        “The amount of Chinese hacking and corporate espionage I have seen is out of this world… You may already know that the Chinese hack our companies, government, and military… That’s why the Chinese have a rampant culture of copying and stealing… the Chinese Communist government forces foreign companies to divulge trade secrets or share intellectual property..”

        You do know that everything you are saying is totally irrelevant to your initial thesis (“This article reads like a propaganda piece”), right? And here we are again with the “Hey I can say random bullshit without any proof!” scenario. Everything you say is false, and you cannot refute that. What I mean by “false” is not necessarily the literal context, but when you apply the context to your initial thesis (regarding to xiaomi, if you forgot). So basically, you are comparing fruits to vegetables; they are plants yes, but different plants with totally different purposes. Xiaomi is Xiaomi and the Chinese gov’t is the Chinese gov’t.

        Tl;dr You have just committed another logical fallacy. Please think about whether the two statements are in conjunction with each other.

        • mellowyellow

          1. “You do know that everything you are saying is totally irrelevant to your initial thesis (“This article reads like a propaganda piece”), right?”

          You do know that you need some reading help? That was not a thesis. That was a passing impression of the article that I wanted to note upfront first, and has no direct expository connection to the rest of my comments except for being tied under the same umbrella of unethical, illegal, and fraudulent Chinese operations.

          You sound like an intellectually handcuffed 16 year old who just learned about the rudimentary, structured essay form and has no idea how thoughts are really conveyed.

          2. “Everything you say is false, and you cannot refute that. What I mean by “false” is not necessarily the literal context, but when you apply the context to your initial thesis (regarding to xiaomi, if you forgot). So basically, you are comparing fruits to vegetables; they are plants yes, but different plants with totally different purposes. Xiaomi is Xiaomi and the Chinese gov’t is the Chinese gov’t.Tl;dr You have just committed another logical fallacy. Please think about whether the two statements are in conjunction with each other.”

          Because you’re so humiliatingly wrong in #1, this whole rant is automatically worthless. You were so caught up in your incorrect reading of my comment, that you cornered yourself into a flawed conclusion.

          Or let me put it in a language you can understand. You were so obsessed whether this was a fruit or vegetable, that you completely missed that it was a fu*kin rhinoceros staring at you.

          Tl;dr You have just committed something worse than a logical fallacy. You just proved you don’t even know how to read. Hope you don’t fail your critical reading section on the SAT.

    • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

      “This article reads like a propaganda piece with so much false information like the newspapers I read in China.”

      Your statement is invalid because you did not prove anything about the article having “propaganda”. Link me to a section of the article, and state the valid sources that proves your thesis; then I will consider your statement being accurate. But for now, you are proving nothing.

      (And your own personal experiences/stories are not valid examples of proper evidence to support your argument, because everyone’s POV is biased.)

      • mellowyellow

        You’re no different than the 50 Cent Party. You’re obviously Chinese, so of course you’re hoping that your rants distract people from very well known facts about the Chinese by demanding proof when there’s an abundance of proof already.

        You’re exactly like a wolf trying to defend his wolf friends that wolves do not eat sheep.
        So your contrived and futile “intimidation” tactic demanding proof doesn’t work here kid.

        Incidentally, who’s as sad as you who upvotes every one of his own comments?

        1. “Your statement is invalid because you did not prove anything about the article having “propaganda”. Link me to a section of the article, and state the valid sources that proves your thesis; then I will consider
        your statement being accurate. But for now, you are proving nothing.”

        Oh bitc* please, gtfoh. You want proof that something READS like a propaganda? If you can’t glean that this comes off as propaganda-ish from the overly saccharine language that borders on becoming a panegyric of xiaomi (while completely ignoring the dark realities), then you’re not half as smart as you
        think you are.

        Also note that I never claimed that this article had to be a propaganda, but that given the realities of China that contrast the misguided tone of this article, it certainly appears like one.

        But of course you’re Chinese, so you predictably and vehemently challenged that it could possibly be a propaganda.

        2. “And your own personal experiences/stories are not valid examples of proper evidence to support your argument, because everyone’s POV is biased.”

        You’re right, so thankfully it’s not just my experience, but of virtually all professionals who have multiple degrees from Ivy League schools and who actually work in the industry and engage with China.

        Unlike you, whose comments make you out to probably be either an 18 year old student who knows nothing about the world but thinks he knows everything, or a 40 year old reject who got his feelings hurt from hearing the truth about China.

  • RH

    Couple reasons they can’t get into the American (USA) MARKET.
    1. FCC probably blocks them, and a lot of Chinese into this market because…
    2. At&t, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile prevent a lot of devices here, using lobbyist to get the FCC to not allow them.
    The more devices they can’t stuff with bloat, lock down, and feature strip, the more devices they can’t control.
    The fewer devices in the USA, the more they can charge for those devices, because the USA is just coming off
    the 2 year contract plan, and people are use to obtaining their phones ONLY from a carrier, so the carrier controls
    what devices are available.

  • Mark Seguin

    All those little fingers from child labor, state sponsored hacking of competitors, and restrictive policies to foreign competition really adds up quick……makes one wonder why they’re not #1.

  • DevSob

    There was no any word about Xiaomi Mi5. In accordance with http://xiaomi-mi5.info, it should be released soon and seems to be the most powerful smartphones at these days.

  • catapult

    Typing on a mipad here, and wishing them all the best…. I’m seriously loving my mipad and miui, I hope the upgrade it to miui 7 And Android marshmallow

  • I have owned four of their phones so far. Currently I use a Mi 4 and I can’t imagine using a phone that’s not made from Stainless Steel ever again. I have their new headphones that are over the ear. I have the mi band. The general pattern with their products is best in class design, ridiculous attention to detail, class leading build quality, and outstanding interoperability with Google’s ecosystem. They are slowly becoming my favorite place to get tech. I’m eyeing their TV currently.

    • mellowyellow

      Xiaomi astroturfer here.

      • Um, no mister yellow. Or is it mister mellow? Is that name french? I can tell from your picture that you have been in an industrial accident of some kind that took your mouth and nose and ears and hair. My condolences.

        That being said, I’m a real person that you can google. You are a nobody using a fake name and no picture. So you are meaningless. : )

        Love you

        • mellowyellow

          Don’t care if you’re real. You’re still an astroturfer.

          Love you too. Mwah.

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            Thanks! LOL

          • mellowyellow

            Thanks! LOL

  • Julius Agbogla

    I believe that Xiaomi coming to the USA and even Canada would be a huge wake up call for all the big smartphone manufactures to find a way to make a good product and keep it affordable. The structure of business that Xiaomi has is profiting them so if the other manufactures use the same strategy the market will be both good for them and the consumer

    • mellowyellow

      They don’t have a legal “business structure.”

      Their “business structure” is to copy and steal foreign IP and marketing, and piggy back off the foreign supply chain.

      Their “business structure” is to use planted Chinese astroturfers to drum up fake interest.

      Their “business structure” is the protection of the Communist Chinese government.

      You’re probably one of the Chinese astroturfers overwhelming sites like this.

      • Julius Agbogla

        I understand that but the stats don’t lie. They are still selling out phones and are one of the biggest smartphone makers in the world so what they are doing right should be looked at by the other manufactures

        • mellowyellow

          Wrong. Nobody else can do what they do because they can not engage in rampant illegal activity and theft on the scale of how the Chinese do it.

          Those stats are unverifiable like most Chinese data are, and even if true are the result of theft and market manipulation that handicaps foreign brands against local brands within China.

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            Nice!!!

          • mellowyellow

            You’re so obsessed with me!!!! LOLOLOL

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            NIce!!!

          • mellowyellow

            Nice!!!

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            K.

          • Julius Agbogla

            Yeah I guess you’re right

  • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

    Here you go! https://sexgodsrockstars.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/butthurt-report-form0.jpg

    Intended for mellowyellow as he is tragically butthurt. Poor kid…

    • mellowyellow

      LOL at these butthurt Chinese!!!

      • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

        LOL at this butthurt kid who likes to call peple butthurt!

        • mellowyellow

          Wooooooooooow. That. Is. So. Clever. LOL

          You pass that checklist with flying colors! HAHA

          • (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

            Thank you butthurt kid!

          • mellowyellow

            You’re welcome!