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Question 1 Answer Yes, but not in the way that you mentioned, you see some people have you fearing that an evil virus is waiting behind every corner. In reality viruses have not spread on mobile devices the way they once did on PCS. Let’s talk about where some real dangers lie: Sharing SD cards with your friends. Syncing your device with someone else’s computer or a public computer Do not download apps from untrusted sources, only download from Google Play or Amazon App store. The best thing you can do it go to the Google Play store and download…

android notifications

Johan Larsson/Flickr Almost every mobile device owner has used apps that are supported by adverts. It is one of the three main ways that developers (large and small) can generate income to fund their app development (and maybe make a profit). The other two ways are, of course, making the app pay-for and using in-app purchasing of one kind or another. In general, users are happy with ad supported apps and, if a good ad network is used, the ads can even be useful. But according to Lookout, some 5% of apps use ad networks which are too aggressive. This…

security

Smartphone privacy has become one of the most intensely debated issues in the tech world. Most of us already back-up data, install anti-virus software on our computers, and lock our car doors. But why is it that our smartphones are going unprotected? If your device gets stolen or you accidentally download malicious applications, all your sensitive data is at risk. Texts, pictures, emails, and more could all fall in the wrong hands. Furthermore, even if you only download apparently safe and “reliable” apps, who can guarantee you that the developers are being completely honest about what they’re doing with your data?…

symantec-android-counterclank-recalled

The issue as to whether the Android.Counterclank attack was a malware or a mere ad network has been much debated last week. Symantec, as the first to report this issue, stated that it was the ‘largest Android malware campaign discovered.’ However, Lookout Security counteracted this report and said that it was not a malware attack, but simply a different ad network strategy. Earlier, Symantec named the code as Android.Counterclank and classified it as a malware, or a Trojan horse. Based on the findings of their researchers, it was a variation of the ‘Android.TonClank’ malware, called ‘Plankton’ by North Carolina State…

push-ad-lookout

Some apps use ads from shady ad networks which allow developers to push ads into the notification bar of the phone; without requiring any action from you. In a way, they are as bad as pop-ups that show up when you click a link on the web. Not to mention, they are annoying because they will keep popping up in your notification bar. Lookout is now releasing a solution to fight this. Called Push Ad Detector, the app will warn you if the apps you’ve installed use this strategy. It does this mainly by scanning for the following ad networks…

lookout2

So apparently, there are two sides to the whole largest Android malware campaign discovery made by Symantec. While Symantec noted that the malware infected 5 million users, Lookout isn’t agreeing to this assessment. In fact, they don’t believe that Android.Counterclank Apperhand SDK isn’t a malware at all, but an ad network. According to Lookout, Apperhand isn’t classified as a malware because it has not shown of anything contrary its typical nature. As they put it, ‘malware is defined as software that is designed to engage in malicious behavior on a device. Malware can also be used to steal personal information…