April 14, 2015
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samsung galaxy s6 edge aa 25

Industry sources from Korea report that sales of the curved Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge flagship are much higher than anticipated, with supply now unlikely to be able to keep up with demand. Currently, the S6 Edge accounts for approximately 50 percent of all Galaxy S6 model shipments worldwide, according to industry insiders, which far surpasses market estimates of 20 to 30 percent of Galaxy S6 sales.

In Korea, combined S6 and S6 Edge pre-orders reached 300,000 units, exceeding early expectations and putting the range on track to be the most popular Galaxy handset. A trend which has also been noted by US carrier T-Mobile. However, Samsung admits that it has failed to make accurate predictions about S6 Edge sales volumes, which may result in some retailers left without stock in the near future.

Samsung Mobile CEO JK Shin has previous stated that Galaxy S6 Edge production will be limited for some time, suggesting that Edge sales may slow once existing stock is used up. Although Shin hasn’t confirmed the source of the issue or how long the company expects it to last, sources say that the supply shortage could last for at least a month.

Sources say that the supply shortage could last for at least a month

While Samsung is already rumored to be ramping up production in response to strong early sales figures, the expense and difficulty involved in producing the curved AMOLED display in the Edge is likely to prevent Samsung from meeting all of the demand.

Reportedly, Samsung’s China-based supplier of curved glass is operating with a 50% yield rate and is limited to just 6.5 million units of production this quarter. To reach an increasing sales target, the company may have to look for an additional display supplier.

Despite the huge price tag, the unique look, strong internal hardware and new features such as Samsung Pay appear to be driving demand for the Galaxy S6 Edge. A strong performance from this year’s flagship is exactly what Samsung needs if it wants to begin regaining some of its lost market share and improving its stalling profit levels.

While it obviously sounds better to be selling out than having stock left on the shelves, Samsung will need to address the supply situation promptly to avoid losing sales to other high-end Android flagships.

Robert Triggs
Lead Technical Writer at Android Authority, covering the latest trends in consumer electronics and hardware. In his spare moments, you'll probably find him tinkering with audio electronics and programming.
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