It looks like Android Q, seen here on a Pixel phone, won't get scrolling screenshots.

Update, May 10, 2019 (10:05 AM ET): It appears the Googler who listed the idea of scrolling screenshots within stock Android as “infeasible” may have spoken too soon. At a fireside chat during Google I/O 2019 (via 9to5Google), multiple members of the core Android development team admitted that implementing scrolling screenshots is, in fact, possible.

David Burke, the VP of Engineering at Android, admitted that it is a “good idea” and that there is “no reason not to do it.” Another Android lead agreed — however, the team also admitted that the concept was not a priority.

In other words, the ability to capture scrolling screenshots could possibly come to stock Android, but don’t expect it anytime soon.


Original article, April 29, 2019 (02:31 AM ET): Scrolling screenshots are one of the most requested features in stock Android, allowing users to capture a lengthy article, message thread or anything else that doesn’t fit in a standard screenshot. Unfortunately, Google has confirmed that it won’t be bringing the feature any time soon.

In a Google Issue Tracker thread spotted by Android Police, a user asked the Mountain View firm to implement the feature. Unfortunately, Google’s eventual response was to change the feature request’s status to “won’t fix (infeasible).”

“Once again, thank you for submitting the feature request. After following up with our product and engineering teams, the feature request will not be able to be considered at this time,” the company added.

It’s a pretty disappointing result, as the likes of Huawei, LG, OnePlus, Samsung, and Xiaomi have natively offered this feature for several years now. In fact, the Galaxy Note 5 was one of the first phones to offer scrolling screenshots back in 2015.

Editor's Pick

Google has been working hard on Android Q, bringing us overhauled permissions, Wi-Fi sharing via QR codes, and a better sharing menu. So it’s not like the Mountain View company is sitting on its hands while Android OEMs bring features to the table. Still, the fact that the firm isn’t bringing scrolling screenshots to Android Q definitely stings a little.

This isn’t the only major feature missing from stock Android, as app twin functionality, system profiles, screen-off gestures and Samsung-style game tools are all absent too. What would you like to see in stock Android? Let us know in the comments!

NEXT: Red Magic 3 announced — A gaming phone that could be your daily driver

Comments
Read comments