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How to manage your saved passwords in Android

Over time, you can collect quite a list.
By
October 7, 2022
Settings logo on Android phone stock photo 2
Edgar Cervantes / Android Authority

As long as websites require passwords, the password autofill provided by Google Chrome will be one of its most useful features. Over time, you can collect quite a list of saved passwords. It’s vital to know how to manage the saved passwords on your Android phone. Fortunately, managing your passwords is almost as easy as the autofill feature itself. You can do it in two different places, and unlike some features, it isn’t buried under multiple menu layers. And while you are at it, you can check if any of your saved passwords have been hacked from the website they belong to, and change them to something secure. Let’s go over this simple procedure, so you can keep your passwords current and your accounts safe.

Read more: How secure are password managers? Should you use one?

QUICK ANSWER

To manage your saved passwords in Android, go to passwords.google.com. Sign in to your account, and you will see all your saved passwords in alphabetical order of the websites they are for. Tap on a website to reach the screen where you can edit, delete, or export the password.


JUMP TO KEY SECTIONS

How to manage your saved passwords in Google Chrome

Begin with the Chrome app open and tap on the three-dot menu in the upper right.

Saved Passwords three Dot Menu
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

Tap on Settings next.

Settings button
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

Now tap on Passwords.

Tap on Password
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

You have found your password collection. The first switch at the top will turn password saving on or off. Auto sign-in is next. You should leave this on unless you are in an insecure environment where it would be a good idea to enter your password manually each time. You will also see, if you have been saving your passwords, a list of those passwords at the bottom. Scroll down until you see the site whose password you want to work with. Tap on the relevant site. If you have a screen lock set for your phone, you will be asked to enter it before you will be shown your passwords. If you do not have a screen lock set, you will have to verify with your Google password. Otherwise, anyone who could get their hands on your phone could change your passwords.

Passwords Page
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

To change your password, tap on the Password line at the end of the obscured password. Delete it and enter your new password. Tap on Done. (You can tap on the icon shaped like an eye to reveal the obscured password.)

Edit Password Page
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

To delete this password and website from your list, tap on the garbage can icon at the top right.

Saved Passwords Delete Password
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

To export your password, tap on the icon that looks like two pieces of paper overlapping. This will copy the password to your clipboard.

Saved Passwords Copy Password for Export
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

How to manage your saved passwords in Google Password Manager

All the passwords you store in Chrome are saved to your Google account. This lets you use your saved passwords on any device you can safely log in to. It also gives you an option when using a computer that does not have Chrome installed. To manage your saved passwords, go to passwords.google.com. You will see a similar page with your list of saved passwords. Again, tap on the website you want to change the password for.

Saved Passwords Password Manager Page
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

Here we see again that the password is obscured. But that doesn’t stop us from deleting it and entering a new one by tapping on Edit.

Saved Passwords Password Manager Edit Page
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

Enter your new password and confirm the edit.

Saved Passwords Password Manager Confirm Edit
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

If we want to lose the website from our saved list, just tap on the Delete button and confirm the deletion.

Saved Passwords Password Manager Confirm Delete
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

And just like in Chrome, if we want to export this password for any reason, we can tap on the icon that looks like two stacked pieces of paper to copy the password to our clipboard for export.

Saved Passwords Password Manager Copy Password
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

How to check if your saved passwords have been compromised

A highly useful feature that does not get enough attention is Password Checkup. Google (on its own or through Chrome) can run down your list of saved passwords and compare them, securely, against a list of accounts that are known to have been part of a data breach or which have shown up on sites where stolen passwords are listed. It gives you a convenient interface for changing the password. In Chrome, the feature is on the Passwords page and is called Check passwords.

Saved Passwords Chrome Check Passwords
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

The process will list the compromised passwords saved to your account.

Saved Passwords Chrome Check Passwords Results
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

At your Google Password Manager page, tap on Go to Password Checkup right above your list of saved passwords.

Saved Passwords Go to Password Checkup 1
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

Tap on the blue Check Passwords button.

Saved Passwords Start Password Checkup
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

Google will display the results. Here we can see there are compromised passwords, reused passwords, and weak passwords to deal with.

Saved Passwords Password Checkup Results
Kevin Convery / Android Authority

Now you know how easy it is to keep your saved passwords current, secure, and conveniently accessible.


Read more: Google’s Password Manager gets major usability updates

FAQs

Your Android phone encrypts your Chrome sign-in data with an encryption key unique to your individual phone. Only then does your phone send the data, in obscured form, to Google.

There are things to do and things to avoid in creating a password. You want longer passwords rather than shorter, and you want them to have a mix of upper and lower case letters, numbers, and special symbols. What you want to avoid is anything that reveals or suggests personal information (year of birth or high school graduation, for example) and any words that you can find in the dictionary.

The reason it’s a bad idea is that if someone figures out your password for one site, they have all of your passwords.

If a year has gone by and you have not had to change the password (because of unauthorized activity, for example), change it.

It is an extra-secure form of authentication that some websites require and others let you opt into. Not every website offers it. Two-factor authentication is the requirement for one more piece of information beyond your password to let you into your account. The extra piece of information might be a code that is sent to your phone or email account. It could also be a fingerprint scan or a facial recognition test.