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With India standing as the world’s second largest smartphone market (next to China), Samsung is pushing hard to make sure they come out ahead of Apple in the long run. They’re doing this by directly catering to the tastes and needs of Indian customers by bringing India-specific features and products to the market, including the powerful mid-range Galaxy J series.

So what exactly is India looking for that Apple is having a hard time providing? Well, right out of the gate, iPhones are expensive, and a lot of Indian smartphone buyers aren’t willing to shell out a boatload of cash for a handset. It’s a nascent smartphone market, which means users are looking for entry-level to mid-tier devices. Apple is banking on the 4-inch iPhone SE to secure their footing in the nation, but the cheapest you can find this relatively low-end iPhone is around 39,000 rupees ($587). Compare this to something like the Galaxy J2, which only costs 14,249 rupees ($215).

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In addition to securing the price point, Samsung is also working to make their lower-end devices feel more premium. This includes using metal design elements on device that would traditionally be entirely plastic. While Apple is the competition overhead, below are a slew of budget Chinese smartphone manufacturers like Xiaomi are also in the game, undercutting the Galaxy J’s pricing and still providing some pretty high-quality Android experiences.

In addition to providing a more premium feel, Samsung is also incorporating India-specific features like a safety mode for motorcyclists. While the user is on his or her bike, incoming callers or texters will receive a notification alerting them that the person they are trying to reach is on a motorcycle and cannot reply. This “S bike” feature is a popular one, considering how many people in India are on motorcycles.

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Since Apple can’t bring the cost of their devices down, they are lobbying for the ability to import used iPhones into the country to sell in the $200-$300 range. It’s no surprise that both Samsung and the cheaper smartphone manufacturers are pushing hard for legislation that would prevent this from happening. Smaller smartphone retailers would also prefer not to see this happen.

What are your thoughts regarding Samsung’s turf battle in China? Who will ultimately win out, and how much depends upon whether or not refurbished Apple products will be allowed across the border? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below, and as always, stay tuned to Android Authority for all the latest news in Android around the globe.