Opinion: Let’s stop the overheating madness

by: Rob TriggsOctober 27, 2015
1.1K

Truely overheating CPU Shutterstock

I’m sure you are all familiar with the Snapdragon 810 overheating saga that has dominated mobile processor talk this year. Well, a recent report from BusinessKorea, which making its way around the tech news sphere, is now hinting at similar issues for Qualcomm’s upcoming Snapdragon 820 SoC. However I really don’t think that this is something that anyone should be so concerned about, at least not yet. Allow me to explain why.

Before we begin I should summarise the report, which cites anonymous industry sources. Apparently, Samsung is making efforts to “stabilize” the Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 that will feature in the company’s upcoming Galaxy S7 flagship. The story goes that Samsung will patch the “microprocessor control program” within the month to help control the heat coming off the chip and might also consider implementing a “radiating pipe”.

Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 AARead more: Galaxy S7 will feature Snapdragon 820 in US and China, Exynos elsewhere: Korean report19

For starters, the microprocessor control program is in charge of things like core and thermal management of the SoC, including gating and clock speed. Developers should attempt to optimize a chip for their particular product, to balance performance against thermal and power limits. It’s not irregular for Samsung to be making adjustments as it moves from a developer environment into product testing. Remember, we aren’t even talking about a finished item yet.

The second part about possibly using a radiating pipe shouldn’t cause alarm bells to ring either. For starters, it’s just speculation. Secondly, devices back in the Snapdragon 801 days sometimes made use of copper pipes to help move heat away from the SoC, but I don’t recall people kicking up a major fuss about “overheating” issues back then. If it keeps the phone cool, then surely it’s the right call?

Xperia-Z3-Heat-Pipe

Did you know: the Snapdragon 801 powered Xperia Z3 featured a heat-pipe, a full two generations before the Snapdragon 810 fuss began.

Even if this story turns out to be true, it’s not exactly an indication of any major problems with the Snapdragon 820 anyway. But perhaps more importantly, neither the Snapdragon 820 nor the Galaxy S7 have been released, let alone tested by any verifiable source. If the Snapdragon 810 taught us anything, it’s that implying that an unfinished product is “overheating” is pretty irresponsible.

The fact of the matter is, if consumers and pundits want more processing power packed into a tiny form factor, they are going to have to accept that these chips are going to produce some level of heat. The Snapdragon 820 is boasting notable gains in CPU, DSP and GPU performance over the 810, and even bigger gains over the chips from just a couple of years ago. Simply put, high-end processors will produce heat and attempting to manage this is in no way indicative of an unexpected issue or overheating problem.

While an overly hot device can of course cause problems, the correct management of the inevitable heat is all part of sensible and prudent product design. Perhaps we should wait until the actual phone arrives in our hands before getting worked up about heat issues once again?

  • Badelhas

    Very well put. All this overheating talk is getting out of hand.

  • nebulaoperator

    You didn’t mention most important thing as long as chip doesn’t throttle there is not much of the issue . And because 810 did it was underclocked .That is the true issue with heat.

    • Pez Smith

      Precisely.
      I assumed the manufacturers tried the copper pipes trick & that didn’t work.

      • GreaterLesser

        The Z5 Premium and the Z5 (I think) have copper pipes and they seem to do fine. Then again the phone (Z5 Premium) isn’t always pushing 4K content to the screen.

        • Been at the store and compared my Z3+ to the Z5. Z5 is very fast, no lag and I really barely noticed the heat compared to my Z3+ whereas at some point I gotta stop using it till it cools down and stops lagging, which can occure pretty damn often…
          Why Z5 premium doesn’t push 4k all the way is because running the UI in 4k won’t give you as much difference as in pictures, games (if we had 4k content games) and videos where you will see a clarity difference. People should’ve stopped looking for pixels a long time ago, it’s not about pixels ;D
          The Z5 Premium could run the 4k panel all the time but obviously the battery life would probably take a hit.

  • Pez Smith

    Get the excuses in early.
    :-)

    If copper pipes were used to mitigate the SD801’s heating then this implies overheat was controlled & didn’t impact functionalities of those phones(see issues on Sony Z3v/4 & LG G2 phones, OPO had to underclock their +2 where SD810 were used).
    Doh! We didn’t complain about SD801 because phones weren’t throttled to death.

    I’ve skipped anything with SD810 … will wait for the SD820.
    How does Apple manage the heating in their phones?

    • jj

      It’s not hard to manage a CPU when it’s only running a dual core processor and 1 gig of ram! LMFAO

      • Diego

        2 gb of ram.
        And 2 very large cores.
        aluminum is the answer here.

        • donuts

          Uh no, the iPhone 6 plus only has 1 gb of ram . But considering the iPhone doesn’t do much, nor does it have many multitasking features maybe one gigabyte is enough.

          • Diego

            the 6s plus has 2gb of ram

          • donuts

            Oh the 6s….. The one that was just released. It is almost 2016, and the truth is , most people have ( and compare) the iPhone 6 which is 1 gigabytes. That is sad for this date in time. Sigh

            Hell, my droid DNA from 2012 had two gigabytes of RAM lol.

          • Diego

            Android needs all that ram to run smooth.
            I switched from an galaxy note 4 because of touchwiss aka sirius samsung lag.
            So android apps need all that ram to perform like there iOS counterparts.

          • donuts

            No, androids need that much RAM because they do a lot more. IPhone you talk, text , surf the web. that’s about it. And you are very limited on options of browsers keyboards messaging apps etc. So when you are very limited, sure one gigabyte maybe enough.

            I have heard that same complaint about TouchWiz, that’s just a manufacturer software i have never used a Samsung device so I can’t attest to that, but I believe you

          • Diego

            Nope android needs ram because the apps are written in java.
            Ios is not that limited anymore.

          • donuts

            You are right, iOS is not nearly as limited as it used to be as they continue to copy Android. Seems like everyone wants to have an Android device , software wise, but have an Apple on the case lol. It’s nice they finally added a back button, but why in the world did they put on the very top left of the phone!?

          • Hussein Abdullah

            not true HTC and Nexus devices run buttery smooth with less than 2 GB ram, my Brothers Nexus 5 2013 runs Marshmallow smoother as an Galagsy S6 edge+ and NOte 5

      • Guest123

        And a low clockspeed.

        • Diego

          I can reach it on the top of the phone I am not complaining.
          My mom uses a galaxy mega like a tablet and she’s always complaining.
          About samsung phones.
          This is true for samsung phones in my country you wood not believe the horror stories I herd with low end samsung devices.
          Many people and this is the most common of them all.
          There phones begin to slow down and then one day, boom they die like they don’t turn off at all even if they connected them to power the phone wood not turn on.
          And wen they finally fix them everything is erased, this has gained samsung a bad reputation on my country, now I don’t know what the hell happened but I see people on iPhone 4s or 5 or 5s.
          Before I saw cheep android phones everywhere, though there is various dollar 200 phones.
          But many people complain about them many have been electrocuted even.
          And when I said my 6 plus had 3 day battery life they did not believe me.
          “Now I know this wood sound extremely biased but I am simply speaking the truth.
          I love android and iOS thats why I have both.

      • Faraz Masood Khan

        Yet dat dual core kick the hell out of snapdragons & every other processor with its performance.

        This also teach us number of cores isn’t every thing.

        • cripow

          If my memory isn’t faining me, the S6 won the multicore processing agains the 6S in geekbench, being a phone months older :).

          Leaving that aside, taking into consideration the lover screen resolution of the iPhones and their improved storage, the 6S outperforms the S6 in real live situations.

          • Faraz Masood Khan

            Yup! 2 cores vs 8 cores! what is the average per core score again?

          • cripow

            I just wanted you to know that it doesn’t “kick the hell out of” the Exynos processor.

            A9’s single core performance is impresive and worth praising, but you saying “2 cores vs 8 cores!” is just an excuse not to admit that overall the A9 isn’t that far apart from the competition (I’m not including the 810 in that statement).

            Apple is definitely the best making the most with the least, but you also have to think that the S6 simply wouldn’t run with the 2 cores of the A9, due to it’s 1440p screen. In my opinion that is one of the reasons why Samsung sacrificed some quality for quantity, to be able to do all your task on your phone, while the CPU also handles nearly the double the amount of pixels that the iPhone 6S Plus has to handle.

            Don’t think that I’m agains Apple or anything, I’m actually an iPhone user myself.

          • Diego

            If the a9 is so powerful imagine what the a9x can do.
            The iPhone 6s plus can handle 1080p at 30 fps, The next generation of the GPU, will be able to handle games at 2048×1336 at 30 fps.
            There by giving the iPhone 7 plus a huge advantage over the competition.
            I mean look at the GPU of the galaxy s6 its a joke handling QHD resolution.
            Now I sea why apple haven’t included QHD yet.

          • EQ

            The SD810 and Exynos 7420 is so powerful imagine what the SD820 and Exynos 8890 can do.
            The S6 and Z5 can handle 1080p/QHD at 30-60fps, The next generation of respective GPU, will be able to handle games at 4k at 30fps.
            There by giving the S7 and Z6 a huge advantage over the competition.
            I mean look at the GPU in Iphone 6s Plus its a joke handling FHD resolution with laggy transparency rendering.
            Now you can se why Apple avoids full HD for 6s and has to up SoC speed for 6s Plus to handle 1080p 2D rendering.

          • Diego

            Lol I have a note 5.
            Seriously it can’t handle games at native resolutions.

          • EQ

            Lol I have an Iphone 6s from work. Seriously it cannot handle games at 1080p.

          • Diego

            Well I love note 5 for the pen, But that touchwiss is pissing me off every day.
            I am going to flash it and hope for the best.
            I contacted samsung support to sea if they could help me but no, they told me that they couldn’t help me.
            iPhone can’t handle 1080p?

          • EQ

            Touchwiz is a pita but I never understood why people complain about launchers when on Android. Here comes one key point in that you can do so much more than on iOS. Just download a new one. Always used Apex Pro launcher. The free edition is quite complete to but only couple of dollars for pro edition makes it my choice. I can do so much more, the graphical effects are better and by far more functional and customisable. My GUI is silky smooth 60fps FHD on my Xperia Z1 in all situations. Heck I can say my phone is way smother than Galaxy S6 Edge which is not always fluid in the interface. Add in “Elun” icon pack and it looks damn clean and elegant.

          • Diego

            Well I am suffering from a sirius case of sam blote.
            By the way my 6 plus is jailbroken.
            So I run background tasks with multiplexer.

          • EQ

            And my Z1 is not rooted and runs stock Lollipop 5.1.1 and works pretty much as I want it to so no need for me to root it. The apps persistant in RAM and constantly running, just those use about 700MB.

          • Diego

            Man then it must be a note 5 problem.
            So in reality you only need like 2 gb of ram on android?

          • EQ

            That is correct. I ‘multi task’ with ease on my Z1 and even postponed apps open up in a second, max 2 if they are complex/large. Those in RAM opens up instantly. I can browse Facebook, have tabs open in Chrome, PowerAMP playing music and just instantly jump between them and the latest used 5 apps besides those I named and even overlay with ‘Small Apps System’ Youtube, translator and more ontop of other apps and minimize them as dots that I place wherever I want on the screen. Tip is to inactivate in apps menu the apps you dont use like say Hangouts, Googlekeep and so on.

          • Diego

            So 3 or 4gb of ram is overkill?

          • EQ

            Always good with more.

          • EQ

            All Iphones (from 5 and onward) except “Plus” editions renders in 750 x 1334. If you watch 1080p or higher res videos or image it will be downscaled to 750 x 1334. 2D and 3D graphics is rendered in native resolution or uppscaled if the phone is struggeling (uppscaled to 750 x 1334 pixels). The Plus versions also sometimes scales up to 1080p depeding on what app it is and what type of content.

          • Diego

            on my 6 plus games run at 30 fps 1080p sometimes it drops to 29fps but thats it.
            Sometimes I plug it in to a tv and play with a wireless controller.
            I don’t understand why can’t my note 5 handle QHD games at 30fps?
            I mean with all that power it should be able to handle it right?

          • EQ

            Iphone upscales lots of games to 1080p. Aint true FHD. Like the Xbox One does with games. They are “1080” when displayed but rendered with less pixels hence you get more bluriness and pixel crawling. Would be smart if the Note 5 also did this since QHD (1440×2560) is 3,7 million pixels that needs to be updated 30 times in a second. FHD (1080×1920) is 2,1 millon pixels. The note at QHD has to do 76% more work to have 30fps vs doing it in 1080p.

          • Diego

            I get 27fps on my note 5 if I am lucky.
            Wood really love to play at 60fps at QHD.

          • EQ

            Then in 1080p it would do 48fps meaning when you are lucky it is 58% faster than your Iphone. Root it and install app that controls native rendering resolution in 3D.

          • Diego

            Thats the thing I like my phones to play games at there native resolution.

          • EQ

            Pride aint taking you nowhere. I hope you dont play PS4 or Xbox One. Lots of games there dont run at native 1080.

          • Diego

            naw man pc gaming for life

          • EQ

            That’s right son. PC and Android becouse the rest is like the Wii. Good to show your friends but when you are alone you just look at it and think of the best way to sell it without loosing a lot of money.

          • Diego

            still good to know.
            crazy how you have to modify a dollar 749$ phone for it to run fast.

          • EQ

            Avoid Samsung.

          • Diego

            The d820 its just now catching up to samsung.

          • cripow

            “The next generation of the GPU, will be able to handle games at 2048×1336 at 30 fps”

            Who says that the next iPhone will even have that resolution? If Apple follows its original policy they will not go to that. Besides, it would be more logical for them to go 1080 at 60fps rather than a higher resolution.

            I don’t own a Galaxy S6 so I can’t tell how it handles it’s 1440p screen, however Apple had a 6 months advantage to in the developing of their CPU, which nowadays is quite a lot considering how fast technology progresses.

            By the way, remember that the S6 has the double of pixels the 6S Plus does? Not to mention the regular 6S. So take into consideration that the GPU in the S6 had the double of work load at all times compared to the A9, so I wouldn’t say that it is all that bad.

          • Diego

            I think the 6s plus handles 1080p at 60fps in most day to day tasks.
            I am not to shur tho because I don’t have one at the moment.

          • cripow

            You are inconsistent with the things you say, you were talking about handling GAMING, and now you change to day to day tasks. Do you expect me to be impressed by the iPhone running day to day tasks at 1080p at 60fps? Because I’m not. If it were gaming it would be a totally different conversation.

            And you are not even sure of the statement you made, why even make it if you have no prove or information to back it?

          • Diego

            I said most.
            Not all.
            It should technically be able to handle most every day tasks at 60fps.
            For gaming I don’t know.
            But for most! every day tasks it should run at 60fps.

          • cripow

            Alright, but what do you base that on? I mean it wouldn’t be weird, but would you mind showing me where you read or saw that?

          • Diego

            Many people Ive asked have told me this many times.
            Hay want to know a fun fact?

          • cripow

            That still doesn’t prove anything…

            Sure, I’m always open to learning new stuff.

          • Diego

            With the graphics horse power apple is claiming I wood not be surprise if it can.
            The fun fact was talking to you about is, Now I know that geek bench is not a proper cross platform cpu benchmark so don’t shoot me please.
            The iPhone 6s is as powerful as my macbook pro mid 2012, with a core i5-3210m.
            I know that mobile cpus are different then laptop cpus so don’t shoot me.

          • cripow

            Why would I shoot you if you are saying yourself that geekbench is not a proper cross platform benchmark?

            Even if it is that powerful, it can’t handle the software your macbook can, simply because it doesn’t have x86 support.

          • Diego

            There was an AMD project called skybridge wich could allow a cpu to run both arm and x86 code.
            But I think it went to shit a long time ago.

          • cripow

            Same old AMD hahahaahah…

          • Diego

            the multi core is impressive for just a dual core cpu.

          • cripow

            No, actually what is impressive about the A9 is the singles core performance. Only two cores nearly match eight.

          • RaySoft

            big.LITTLE architecture only uses 4 cores at a time. Even tho it’s 8 cores, it only uses either the high-end quad cores for heavier tasks, or the smaller quad cores for small tasks thus saving battery. The 8 cores never operates at the same time.
            And comparing a dual core against quad cores should be no contest actually, even tho’ A9’s two cores are stronger per-core than other SoC’s.

            And don’t forget that if the benchmark program itself doesn’t have to be well optimized for more cores.
            The hardware is _never_ better than it’s software!

          • cripow

            Oh, that’s good to know. Thanks!

          • This is not actually true. At one point, such as on exynos octacores from several years ago it was however. Current 8 core socs such as the exynos 7420 and snapdragon 810 use something called heterogenous multiprocessing(hmp) which lets all 8 cores run at the same time if needed. If you monitor your cpu usage with an app like perfmon in real-time while running a benchmark you will notice this as well.

          • abhisheksaral

            Octa Core to a Dual Core in multicore performance!?
            See Single core it kicked asses out of it. Also a lot of Apps only use 1-2 Cores at a time or 3 at max.

          • cripow

            Read the response I wrote to Faraz Masooon Khan.

          • Not true. In fact there was a recent study at anandtech that found most Android applications take great advantage of quad and octacore systems.

      • Jonathon Rios

        Yet the graphics in games still look better on iOS because developers won’t put the time and effort into Android versions.

    • EQ

      Apple phones also throttle but due to design, aluminium frame and a chipset that is cooled a bit better due to design and size it takes longer time. Well atleast enough time so it doesn’t throttle in benchmarks (which only run for 1 or 2 minutes regarding intensive parts). In games that push the hardware you’ll see throttling and/or framebuffer scaling aswell as turning off effects and more to reduce rendering load/computing load.

    • Mohd Danial

      its magical for something that has dual core and a smaller battery yet able to keep up

  • Peter Mulders

    The size of the problem depends on the phone the chip it’s in. Though I love the aluminium unibody from HTC, it significantly increases the temperature of the outside of the phone when the SD810 is put to hard work. Other phones with the same SD810 have less of a problem because of the used materials.

    • jj

      Oh really????? Tell that to the FIRST phone running the 810…. The G Flex 2! Who along with the M9 had some of the WORST throttling issues of ANY of the 810 devices…. and it was made of plastic!

    • Uberjon

      Really? The shell getting warm is a good thing! That means it’s drawing the heat away from the CPU to dissipate into the air..

      • Daggett Beaver

        Yes, dissipating the heat is a good thing, which is why the copper pipe approach can help. But the fact that the SoC is getting so hot to begin with means it’s sucking your battery dry. Dissipating the heat doesn’t do much to address that.

        • Yes it does? If the chip just needed more room for the heat to circle around and to be able to run as normal as possible then it’s most likely to have a brick of a phone. The Z3+ that I own gets extremely hot, yet warm in just a certain place and throttles, often. What if the chip wasn’t the problem but the phones thickness and cooling system is? The Z5 that has double pipes and paste around the phone adressed that problem and actually gave the phone a significant boost on battery life compared to my Z3+.

    • EQ

      That’s the point of good cooling! It radiates the heat to the mobile phones frame and the outside! That is the sign of good cooling design else the heat would be trapped inside and make the chipset get much warmer and probably overheat. Since you dont have airflow inside the phone you have to rely on transfering heat to the outerside of the phone and that heat is reduced by outside airflow and air temperature.

  • Jean Serien

    CPU performance is one thing and not everything.
    Manufacturers must work performances, autonomy, and software optimization, together.
    Otherwise it becomes a Frankenstein processor ;-)

    • David Onter

      Even the GPU throttles on some of the 810 devices.

  • D13H4RD2L1V3

    I have to agree.

    I dislike the SD810, but we shouldn’t immediately jump the gun on a processor that’s still in development.

    I think it’s time OEMs improve their cooling systems for their devices.

  • Daggett Beaver

    “If the Snapdragon 810 taught us anything, it’s that implying that an unfinished product is “overheating” is pretty irresponsible.”

    That’s not what it taught us, and it wasn’t irresponsible. The SD810 did run too hot, and caused problems for a number of phones. Just because OEMs have tamed it recently (by throttling it and underclocking it, in some cases) doesn’t negate that fact.

    • Hussein Abdullah

      exactly!

  • EQ

    The real issue is though that several mobilephone developers dont accomodate a cooling solution that is adequate for choosen SoC thermal output. Therefore you also dont get sustained perfomance just short burst of perfomance before it throttles making the new chipset barely better than older SoC (older SoC that dont overheat due to design of cooling solution) in real world use. Keyword: Adequate cooling solution. Heatpipes spreading heat on plate and to sides and back, aluminium baseplate with the core in copper, effective heatpads/paste between SoC chipset and plate, location of chipset and more. Anyone who built a PC knows the basics of CPU cooling, material, design and pads/paste used to transfer heat.

    • Hans Pedersen

      Isn’t that on Qualcomm’s table? They’re responsible to make a reference design, showing the recommended configuration and cooling. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a reference design from Qualcomm with a heat-pipe.

      • EQ

        Depends if they have released a thermal reference design to follow. But I bet many mobile phone manufacturers dont follow or wouldn’t follow it and instead cut corners to slim the design and keep it as thin as possible. A look between for example Xperia Z5 with dual heatpipes and HTC M9 show huge difference in throttling. M9 basically throttles directly. Z5 can hold on for much longer and record 4k at 15-20 minutes before reaching throttling level. Both use SD810. It is also relative as in the size of the phone. Pretty much all phones dissipates the heat from SoC onto the metal frame that is sandwiched inbetween the logic board(s) and screen. To reduce weight some make this really thin, compact, holes in it and so on.

    • Hey EQ. Basically what they’ve done with the Z5 familys cooling system is great then? And the 810 will perform well in the longterm instead of just a short burst like you wrote? Cause I’m thinking of the Premium. Heh..

      • EQ

        Well I would look for in-depth reviews testing if there is throttling with prolonged heavy use but it sure will do a lot better than most other SD810 equipped mobile phones if not better than all. I do now from some initial tests that it manages to record around 15-20 minutes in normal room temperature with 4k. This compared to other SD810 equipped phones that shutdown camera before even reaching 5 minutes. The Z3+ that also has SD810 but only one heatpipe and probably different heatsink shut downs the camera before 5 minutes of 4k recording.

        • Ye about the Z3+, I have it. It gets hot on a single spot and lags pretty much, I can imagine it’s the throttle. It’s nice that they put a cooling system in their new phones. I’ll follow your advice and wait for a more in depth review. Thanks for the reply back!

  • Keith Taylor

    @ Robb Triggs, Since for me Apple is not an option just due to preference. There arent many options when it comes to top tier, top performing Android phones and tablets. I have asked this for a year now yet no one seems to be able to answer so I am asking once again. Whats wrong with the K1 and X2 that noone wants to buy it. I am not a tech guy but I do keep up with some of these things. The K1 in my N9 is smooth and fast with some but not alot of heat. I think the update to MM helped. The X1 in a phone would be awesome IMO.

    • Diego

      the tegra x1 maybe on a tablet but not a phone.
      We can compare to the a9x.

    • 1213 1213

      X1 won’t work in a phone, too much heat for a small device.

    • Hussein Abdullah

      the K1 is designed for tablets, thats the problem

      • Keith Taylor

        I’m afraid you can have to explain that one to me sir. I didn’t know that was a difference of ham processor that can go on a tablet and one that can go inside of the phone I thought pretty much since the architecture was the same that they could use the same processor unlike laptops in full fledge computers

        • Diego

          form factor.
          sense a tablet is much larger can have a bigger battery.
          The tegra x1 can go in there.
          Now if the tegra x1 went in to a smartphone it wood have to be smaller and also meet power requirements.

        • Diego

          this is also the case for the k1

  • Lochheart

    Again, the problem with S810 is not overheat.
    The S808 overheat too, the Exynos get hot too.

    The main problem is throttling. This kind of thing you see with deep test like Ars Technica or Anandtech, not just regular benchmarks.

    S810 throttle a lot.

    • donuts

      So, in other words we have reached the peak of our processing technology in smart phones.

  • Shawny

    Snapdragon and overheating chips are still a better love story than twilight.

  • Kiss my Asthma

    Looks like we have hit a huge roadblock in processing power, from this point forward thinner phones or stronger processors are just not viable, in fact are causing diminishing returns when it comes to processing power as was portrayed by the throttling issues of the 810. At this point I think the only sensible thing for OEMs to do is take a step back and figure out the best cooling solution, which if I had to choose one, Microsoft’s solution seems the best on paper (of coarse I am holding off actual judgement till the reviews).

  • Paul Murza

    The heat output, at least for me and other people around me, was the least of a problem. The big issue consisted of the throttling that made the phone feel extremely laggy. Currently i have a lg g flex 2 which is limited to 1.56 ghz, it was advertised as having 2.0 ghz. So yeah, it is a big deal, many customers were ripped off and no one is solving the problem. I think we have to watch the whole snapdragon thing suspiciously.

  • An Droid

    Luckily we only get Exynos in our Samsungs in Africa. Never, in 6 years, had a overheating problem with my S3, S5 or S6 edge. Why not use it internationally in Samsung phones?

    • The Exynos on the S6 does overheat, not as much as the 810 but it does. In the article which explained if consumers want more power, then the more heat a chip is going to produce. I am surprised you haven’t noticed your S6 heat up whereas a lot of people have, bias?

      • An Droid

        Why be a dick!? Have you even used a phone with an Exynos processor? No, of course not, your frame of reference is “other people’s” experience. Dickhead!

        • Diego

          Every phone over heats sometimes man.

          • An Droid

            There is a difference between heating up and overheating. This article is about overheating, and my point is that the Exynos processor does not overheat like the Snapdragon 810 does. And that’s a well known fact.

        • I wasn’t being a “dick” nor did I call you names by anyway, your reply did though. To answer your question: Yes, I have used phones with exynos processor, S3 and S6 Edge. Most phones do get hot now and days, we just need a better cooling system which they already started building in devices.
          My Galaxy S3 didn’t get hot at all, but my friends S6 Edge does get warm and has the same issue as Snapdragon 810 when it comes to 4k recording. Difference is the power of the chip and cores running. As I mentioned, they have been putting cooling system now. New Z5 series from Sony with two heat-pipes and pasta whereas Microsofts Lumia went with liquidcooling. :) S6 Edge+ I haven’t tried but I can imagine that the heating is better in there since there’s more room for the heat to circle around. Problem is, making slim ass phones won’t really work in the long term. Xperia Z3+ (my current phone) taught me that hehe.. Thanks for the reply back!

        • An Droid

          If you don’t want to be called a dickhead, don’t accuse people of being bias! I am relating my experience, not punting a brand. I have owned Nokia, Ericsson, Motorola and HTC as well, so no, I’m not bias.

  • Gaurav Pandey

    It’s madness, madness, I tell you! For the love of God, don’t do it! – Princess Consuela Banana Hammock 👸😻😁

  • Jonathon Rios

    Don’t rush out processors and spend more time tweaking them for performance.

  • cdm283813

    Qualcomms fault. Should have retired the 810 number altogether and release rev 2 as the 815. Doesn’t help either when rev 2 chips in those Sony phones over heat during video recording.
    The year is almost over and so far Qualcomm screwed many Android flagships. Last year this time they were king of the world. This year we have to second guess their chips.

    • 1213 1213

      Apparently the z5 runs cooler than the s6 does.

    • Hussein Abdullah

      Qualcomm threw HTC (partly HTC’s own fault) into almost bankruptcy, screwed OP2, Sony Z4 and others totally over

  • Hussein Abdullah

    I dont see a Problem with the 810, winter is coming in europe, i have transportable Radiator with me all day ;)

  • Nex

    All that added performance but nothing to spend it on outside of the synthetic benchmarks which only the spec junkies cares about.

    If you think any developer is going to spend big money on developing apps to utilize a S820 to the fullest while practically ignoring 99% of the Android userbase I got a bridge somewhere in Nigeria to sell you. That hasn’t changed for the last 5 years and it’s not going to change for the next 5 because plain old Economics 101.

  • justyfier

    we should try to find a system to use the heating to recharge the phone

  • Steve Reed

    remember the last year? About the same time first rumours about overheating of 810 emerged. SD was denying all the problems new chip was facing. Samsung also supported them for a long time. All this saga lasted several months, until G2 Flex was released. We know how it ended… and what SOC Sammy is using in his flagships. Don’t hold you breath’s guys

  • ChrisGX

    The problem with these rumours is not that heat dissipation is not a matter worthy of attention but rather that the rumours are very likely ill-informed. Still, it is unwise to pretend to knowledge that none of us actually possess. So, only a cool running SoC will now truly dispel doubts about the SD 820 – the mud having already been slung. Also, power efficiency (i.e. maximizing performance while minimizing power consumption/thermal envelope) remains the key design challenge for all CPUs and mobile SoCs in particular. So, a SoC that performs well and generates little heat is always better than one that needs a heat pipe to achieve the same level of performance and effective heat dissipation. The latter will always use more power.