Welcome to this week’s edition of Android Q&A! As always, we try to answer as many of your great questions as possible. This week, we talk about why phones are so expensive, just how secure is Android and a lot more. Let’s get started!


Question 1

How secure is Android? – Dante

Answer

At a major conference, executive chairman of Google Eric Schmidt, claimed that Android was more than iOS and while the audience didn’t quite buy it, that doesn’t change the fact that Android has several layers of security to protect users.

google verify apps defense (1) Qz

While there is a general consensus (albeit a false one) that Android is less secure than other mobile operating systems, this is not the case. Overall, both the Linux kernel for Android and the Darwin kernel for iOS are both equally vulnerable to bugs, which when exploited allow hackers to gain unauthorised access.

The bottom line is that Android isn’t any more or less secure than iOS, and if you’re not engaging in high risk behaviour (like downloading apps from sources outside the Google Play Store), you should be able to enjoy your Android phone without an issue.

For more information on Android security, check out this article.


Question 2

Google-Nexus-5-black-vs-white-aa-12

I have two Google accounts for some reason, can I merge the two into one? – Chai Pi

Answer

Yes you can, and while many videos that we found were overly complex, we’ve managed to find a very straightforward video to help you do just that. If you’d like to find out how to merge your Google accounts you can follow the link by clicking here.


Question 3

Nexus 5 ifixit teardown (3)

Why are phones so much more expensive than tablets? Most phones are $600-800 unlocked, while tablets are $2-300, why is this the case? -Anton

Answer

According to Asus’ regional director Jonahan Santaub, smaller devices like smartphones require more testing and development in order to shrink components down without affecting heat.

[quote qtext=”With small devices, often there’s more engineering, development, and testing required to shrink down the components without affecting the heating, for example, and still offering the best performance. I think the development and tooling costs are slightly higher.” qperson=”Asus’ regional director Jonahan Santaub” qsource=”Cnet” qposition=”center”]

While this is a valid point, we are of the opinion that it’s not the biggest factor. The demand for smartphones far exceeds tablets, and it therefore allows OEMs to charge more for phones. There’s also the problem with perception. Most people would look at an $800 tablet and claim that it is unnecessary as they can get a laptop offering greater productivity and more power for the same amount of money.


And another edition of Android Q&A comes to a close. This weekly show exists because of your great questions, so keep ‘em coming! Let us know what you’d like to see Android Authority cover, and don’t forget to send in your questions in the form below, or by commenting on the Google+ posts and Youtube videos of this show.