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The United States Senate today voted in favor of a bill that would repeal the FCC’s December decision to end the rules governing the internet known as Net Neutrality. The measure passed (via The Verge) in a 52 to 47 vote, a larger margin than expected.

Insider predictions saw a vote down party lines in the Senate, but it appears that three Republicans voted in favor of the bill. Those three votes along with the 47 from Democrats and two from Independents cemented the bill’s victory.

However, the celebrations are likely to end today, as the bill faces an extremely bleak future at the Republican-controlled House of Representatives.

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While it is unlikely that the House will pass the bill, even if it did it is almost guaranteed that President Trump would veto the proposal immediately. Ajit Pai, the leader of the FCC who is largely responsible for the push to kill Net Neutrality, is a Trump-appointee.

Still, it’s interesting to see that three Republicans sided with Net Neutrality. That means that all the campaigning for the measure online is actually working, if only in minor ways.

Net Neutrality is expected to be a hot topic as we get closer to the November mid-term elections.

However, it is expected that Net Neutrality will be one of the major talking points in the congressional elections, coming in November of this year. Young people especially are expected to come out to vote in much greater numbers than usual to make sure that their voice is heard when it comes to the future of the internet.

With three Republicans changing sides on the issue, does this mean we’ll also see more Republicans turn in preparation for November? After all, a Republican seeking re-election in November will likely benefit if they are able to say, “I voted ‘yes’ to the Net Neutrality bill back in May.”

Once again though, the chances of enough Republicans turning to enable the bill to pass the House are pretty much nil.

We will keep you posted on the bill’s development as it makes its way through Congress.

NEXT: Net Neutrality now has a specific death date – June 11, 2018