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Outside the USA, Huawei is becoming a company set to rival that of even Samsung. Like its Sino-brother, Xiaomi, the company’s combination of aggressive price points and good hardware choices have paid off big time, both in its home country and abroad. Inside the USA, however, Huawei is still plagued by allegations and concern regarding matters of espionage and national security.

The Seattle Times recently interviewed Huawei’s Head of International Media Affairs, Joe Kelly, who in addition to a rather blunt take down of Windows Phone 8, sought to stand firm on what his company feels are false allegations: “There is no evidence against us. It’s supposition.” Mr. Kelly is, of course, referring to the US government’s allegations that his company presents a national security risk, and that its hardware can be used for purposes of espionage, especially amid concerns that Huawei has ties to the Chinese government.

The irony of course was pointed out in reference to an article published by The New York Times earlier this year. The NYT, citing information leaked by Edward Snowden, “revealed the NSA had ‘pried its way into the servers in Huawei’s sealed headquarters,” monitored Huawei executives’ communications, and gathered information that could allow the NSA to “exploit Huawei’s technology so that when the company sold equipment to other countries … the N.S.A. could roam through their computer and telephone networks”. An interesting situation to say the least, and one that Huawei apparently isn’t letting damper it’s future efforts.

Although the USA accounts for only 30% of Huawei’s sales, it’s still an important market. Kelly offered that, “We’re committed to when the U.S. government decides we pose no risk. We’re patient. We’re happy to return to the U.S. market.” For the complete story, including information regarding the allegations Huawei faces for illegal IP theft, please check out the source link below.