jason titus chrome-Google IO 2016The demise of Flash has been a long time coming. The once ubiquitous medium of online entertainment has grown long in the tooth and is expected by many to be completely dead in the next two years. Adding its nail to the Flash coffin, Chrome has announced that they will start blocking Flash content starting in September.

This move will initially just block “behind the scenes” content, which Google estimates is responsible for roughly 90 percent of the Flash content on the web. By December, Chrome will set HTML5 to the default medium for games and videos. Sites that exclusively support Flash will be unaffected.

Although those of us who were around when AlbinoBlackSheep and eBaum’s World were the cornerstones of the content section of the internet will bemoan this death, the axing of Flash is actually a pretty positive thing. The ancient platform is renowned for its security vulnerabilities and resource-heavy methodologies.

This should come as no surprise to anyone. Chrome has been steadily trimming its Flash support for years, with September of last year seeing them automatically freeze non-essential or ad-related Flash content. Updates have gradually provided less and less support for the platform. It may seem a bit heavy handed, but this lack of support is a targeted effort on the part of Google to shove websites toward HTML5, which is a much more secure and efficient medium.

What are your thoughts regarding Chrome’s hand in the demise of Flash? Let us know your take in the comments below.

Comments
Read comments