Intellijoy best educational Android games for kids
Childhood is an important part of human development. Its the age when you first expose yourself to a lot of new information. Thus, parents seem to really like teaching their kids about things with learning games that are also fun for the kids. Thus, most kids games for Android are also educational. Here are the best educational Android games for kids!



ABC Kids

Price: Free

ABC Kids is one of the better (and free) educational Android games for kids. It’s a simple game that teaches things like the ABCs, how to read, and the difference between upper case and lower case letters. The games are super simple and reward kids with in-game stickers for completing the various tasks. This one is obviously for younger kids around Kindergarten age. The developers, RV AppStudios, have a bunch of other decent kids games for learning other stuff.


Bubadu games

Price: Free to play

Bubadu is a developer on Google Play with a few decent educational Android games for kids. Most of them are virtual pet games where you feed, clothe, bathe, and take care of a virtual pet. However, they all include between two and three dozen minigames that are educational for the most part. For instance, the Bubbu game has a 2048 game and that helps teach kids basic addition. We’ll admit, they’re not the most educational Android games on the list, but people really seem to like them.

Bubadu is one of the best educational android games for kids


codeSpark Academy

Price: Free to play

codeSpark Academy is a kids game with some real educational value. It helps teach kids the very basics of coding through simple counting games. You would think that this game is for older kids, but it seems like kids in early grade school would do just fine with it. Basically, if they’re old enough to play Minecraft, they’re old enough to play this. The game also features daily rewards for completing puzzles, three profiles per game download (for those with multiple kids), and no advertising or in-app purchases.


Duck Duck Moose games

Price: Free

Duck Duck Moose is another developer on Google Play with a bunch of educational Android games for kids. Some of the better games include Fish School, Duck Duck Moose Reading, and Moose Math. The games have educational content consistent with their names. Thus, the games help teach kids to read, basic math, and Fish School focuses on colors, shapes, problem solving, other stuff. The games are all free as far as we can tell so it’s a good budget option for parents as well.

best educational android games for kids


The Endless games

Price: Free

Developer Originator has a few really good educational Android games for kids. They include Endless Alphabet, Endless Reader, Endless Wordplay, Endless Numbers, and Endless Spanish. As you can imagine, the games cover words, letters, reading, and foreign language along with some mathematics. It’s mostly for younger kids around Kindergarten age and younger. All of the apps are free, although there is a $29.99 version of Endless Reader if you want the extra content.



Intellijoy

Price: Free / Up to $2.99 each / $5.99 per month

Intellijoy is a massive developer of kids games for mobile. They have a huge collection of kids games and most of them have educational value. Some examples include Intellijoy Early Learning Academy and the Kids Learn series with games for sorting, coloring, shapes, reading, numbers, counting, puzzle solving, and more. Most of the games cost around $1.99-$2.99 each with the Early Learning Academy game using a subscription service for $5.99 per month or $47.88 per year. You can go with whatever ones you want, but you have plenty of options.


Khan Academy Kids

Price: Free

Khan Academy Kids is one of the newer educational Android games for kids, comparatively speaking. It’s by Khan Academy, renown for its free learning platform for adults. The kids version has a variety of mini-games that help teach a bunch of subjects, including reading, literacy, language, math, logic, and expression. It’s entirely free with no in-app purchases, ads, or subscriptions and that helps make it an appealing choice for parents. It’s mostly for preschool level kids up through Kindergarten or first grade. Thus, the games are sufficiently simple.


Masha and the Bear

Price: Free / Varies

Masha and the Bear is actually a mobile game version of an old Russian TV show of the same name. Google Play has two Masha and the Bear games and both of them have educational value. The first game has 13 mini-games with learning experience for kids ages two through nine. The second game is mostly an interactive puzzle game. They are both quite popular and people seem to like them. Plus, you can buy merch on Amazon if your kid really likes it.


PBS Kids games

Price: Free

PBS Kids is quickly turning into a huge developer of educational Android kids games. The company has games for many of its shows and a dedicated PBS Kids Games app with a bunch of educational content. We recommend the PBS Kids Games game first linked with the button below. It features over 100 mini-games with lessons for science, math, reading, and more. Plus, it interacts with PBS Kids programming in case you want a good one-two punch with what your kids watch on TV.


Starfall

Price: Free / $35-$270 per year

Starfall is a free public service that helps children learn how to read. The app basically does the same thing. There are a variety of games that help teach kids reading, comprehension, letters, and other things revolving around literacy. The official website has a bunch of content as well if you have a tablet or computer. The free version gives you some basic content. There are various subscription tiers if you want some more advanced stuff. The home membership is the cheapest at $35 per month. The more expensive tiers are for teachers and schools.

Starfall is one of the best educational Android games for kids


If we missed any great educational Android games for kids, tell us about them in the comments! You can also click here to check out our latest Android app and game lists!

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