Here’s what’s new with Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 810 v2.1

by: Rob TriggsJune 18, 2015
2.6K

Qualcomm Snapdragon

Some methodical digging around in some kernel sources has revealed that Qualcomm has developed a new 2.1 version of its contentious Snapdragon 810 mobile SoC. Throwing further fuel on the speculative fire that something is not quite right with Qualcomm’s flagship processor.

If you’re not familiar with the saga by now, the gist of the story is that various industry sources, observers, and tests have suggested that the Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 runs too hot and/or throttles its peak speeds under heavy loads. Just how problematic this is is still being debated.

The folks at AnandTech have done a little digging into version 2.1 and have come up with some very interesting performance results.

Before we delve any deeper into the Snapdragon 810 v2.1, it should be noted that a processor revision in and of itself is not an admission of a fault or problem. Nor does it mean that such a problem has been fixed. Qualcomm has made similar revisions in the past with its Snapdragon series, such as the Snapdragon 801 8274-AB and AC models, simply refining the design further or adding in some new features.

The new v2.1 chip has recently appeared in the Xiaomi Mi Note Pro and the Sony Xperia Z4 (Z3+)

Now, a little history about the chip. The Snapdragon 810 v1 was the engineering sample that showed up sometime in September 2014. This was when the first rumors about the overheating issue began, but as a non-final product the speculation didn’t really carry much weight.

It was the v2 chip that shipped in the first Snapdragon 810 devices, including the LG G Flex 2 and HTC One M9. These have shown some signs of performance throttling in order to avoid overheating, but performance updates have been issued which suposidly address any problems. The new v2.1 chip has recently appeared in the Xiaomi Mi Note Pro and the Sony Xperia Z4 (Z3+).

Performance Improvements

First up, there appears to have been a mild clock increase to the GPU with version 2.1. The Adreno 430 now runs at 630MHz, representing a 5 percent increase in performance over the older 600MHz clock. No doubt this is an effort to close the gap on the impressive GPU performance boasted by Samsung’s Mali-T760 MP8 powered Exynos 7420.

Snapdragon 810 v2 Memory Bandwidth

Memory latency in the chip’s L1 and L2 caches appears to have been improved by around 15 percent compared with v2, but DRAM latency remains pretty much the same. However, overall memory bandwidth has seen a more consistent improvement in performance, showing around a 33 percent increase in the main memory and an average 38 percent across all memory segments.

This was one area that there was definitely room to improve over the v2 chip, considering that Qualcomm made the move over to LPDDR4 RAM. This new update should see the SoC put in an even better performance when moving large chunks of data to the main memory, such as when recording and processing high resolution video content.

What about the throttling?

Testing found that there was “noticeably less throttling on the A57 cluster” in the latest revision but the effect is still present in order to keep the cores within their TDP limits during heavy workloads. All threads can still be forced off the A57 cluster if the temperatures increase too much, but things look to have improved with v2.1.

Unfortunately, we can’t see by exactly how much things have changed between v2 and v2.1, so we’ll have to wait for further testing to see how this affects real world performance. Judging by the issues facing Xperia Z3+ owners and Sony’s questionable response, there are still some noticeable persisting problems.

Snapdragon-808-throttling

Testing by ArsTechnica previously showed substantal throtting with the Snapdragon 810 v2 when crunching heavy workloads over a long period of time. It’s not clearly how much things have improved with v2.1.

It is also possible that subtle design differences between the two tested handsets (the One M9 and Mi Note Pro) are also enough to affect throttling by a perceivable margin. In other words, throttling may manifest differently depending on the smartphone design. Cooling, or lack thereof, is a big part of this issue and more spacious handsets may not throttle has much. There are still a few gaps left to fill in.

In summary, v2.1 adds some minor improvements to the Snapdragon 810’s GPU and memory performance, but the revision doesn’t appear to have completely addressed CPU throttling, despite noticable improvements. Difficult to spot changes like these are sure to continue to add to the lack of consensus about whether the Snapdragon 810 is a suitable chip for mobile. The Snapdragon 820 can’t arrive soon enough.

  • Peter Mulders

    “Just how problematic this is is still being debated.” I’ll tell you how problematic! My One M9 runs smooth until you fire up two or three heavy apps at the same time while charging the battery when it’s on 2% or so. Yesterday night this happened and the phone just shutted down and it wouldn’t turn on again untill thirtyfive minutes later when it was cooled down a bit. Also, I almost burned my fingers on the crazy hot back while I held it.

    • PC_Tool

      Exchange it. This is not “normal” for the M9 unless you’ve installed a custom ROM/kernel that is totally mishandling things.

      • NorgesGlasset

        It is normal according to alot of people

        • PC_Tool

          *laughs*

          Trolls are usually more clever. Try again?

          • NorgesGlasset

            *laughs* (are you 12??)

            Trolls? Oh, im sorry.. You are mistaking FACTS you can find everywhere for trolling…
            That’s just sad.. :/

          • PC_Tool

            You actually tried again…now that’s downright hilarious.

            “FACTS”

            …you misspelled “FUD”. I’m betting you wouldn’t know an actual “fact” if it painted itself purple and danced naked on top of a harpsichord singing “Actual Facts Are Here Again.”

            If you actually believe the sh*t you spew is fact, well; That would indeed be sad.

          • NorgesGlasset

            Hahaha!
            So… Just because you dislike someone saying it’s a common problem that the One M9 gets hot you get mad and really childish!? That’s just sad, dude…
            Over half the people I know that has the M9 have heat issues.
            And that is on the stock rom pre-installed on the phone..
            And you can read and watch videos about it in several forums, articles, youtube channels etc.. Gets hot and lags.
            Note that not ALL the M9 phones have this problem..
            But aluminium phones will get a little bit hotter anyway.

          • PC_Tool

            …and there it is. You reversed course so quickly, I’m amazed it didn’t give you whiplash.

            “it’s a common problem”

            Common!=normal. You did say “normal” (thus implying intended/as designed), did you not? Classic.

            Also note that hearing about it frequently hardly makes it “common”. It utterly discounts the users you are not hearing from (any and all users to whom the heat is not causing problems). This is known as the “vocal minority” and you are taking their word not only as Gospel, but as the Be-All and End-All of the story. Hallmark of the uninformed. I admit it; I laughed again.

            “Over half the people I know that has the M9 have heat issues.”

            You just wrote that. I can hardly believe it, myself. I feel dumber just having read it.

            That could mean you know 1 person with an M9. Hardly telling. (Anecdotal Evidence is only marginally more useful than pissing in the wind). Let me guess – this is the type of data you base your “facts” on, right? Oh man…it’s almost too much.

            “Gets hot and lags.”

            Far cry from “shuts down and won’t turn on” and “burns my fingers”. (These are the claims made by the OP which you called “normal.”) – You’re changing the narrative again. At this rate in a reply or two you’ll be saying it’s mildly warm and it occasionally lags for a barely noticeable moment.

            Your only defense is to weasel out of being held accountable by diluting your claims. It’s ridiculously entertaining. Keep it coming though. Don’t let your abysmal (hilarious) failure get you down.

            Let’s see just how far you can backpedal this b*tch.

          • NorgesGlasset

            Are you retarded??
            I have not changed course in any way.. I am saying the same thing..
            A “common problem” is a “normal problem” and does NOT imply it is designed that way..

          • PC_Tool

            Ah. I see. English must not be your first language…or the school system miserably failed you.

            Normal: The standard. Expected. Functioning as intended.

            Common: Occurring often. Prevalent.

            “A “common problem” is a “normal problem””

            So do you just not “get” basic English, or is this another ridiculous attempt to rationalize your previous idiocy? There is no such thing as a “normal” problem. It’s contradictory. The very definition of “problem” means it falls outside of the norm.

            You’ve gone from “it’s normal” to “It’s common” and attempted to redefine the word. Well, if that’s not a change of course, it means you are incapable of forming a coherent argument. I’m not sure which is worse, but it sure is entertaining.

          • NorgesGlasset

            It really depends of the context.. As you should know..
            Like in the sentence “a common problem” and “normal problem” it really is the same thing..
            Even if you transelated it into other languages they say the same thing.
            And depends a bit of US or UK English too..
            So don’t try to school me..

          • PC_Tool

            As you wish. I’ll leave you to your ignorance.

          • SirTampax

            lol a grammar nazi

      • Peter Mulders

        HTC won’t replace it for this as almost everybody experiences this kind of heat.

        • PC_Tool

          After this post, I am really struggling to try and believe you were being sincere in your OP – but it ain’t easy.

          Um, no. Nowhere near “almost everybody” experiences heat that burns people’s fingers and forces the device to power off. That’s absolutely ridiculous.

          No. HTC will replace it if what you stated in your OP was true.

          So congratulations – get it replaced.

          • Peter Mulders

            Since I’m European and not American it isn’t that simple. There’s no HTC Advantage program here. When you have a problem, they won’t even replace it unless they can’t fix it. You can send it in for repair and if they don’t find a problem, they will charge you. With their testing methods I doubt they will see my problem.

    • Do you have the latest firmware? My M9 doesn’t heat up more than my father’s Note 3 (with latest firmware and Lollipop). On normal use (net browsing, mails, facebook) the M9 is cool while the Note 3 is warmer. In games the M9 gets hotter but the Note 3 is super hot. I don’t know how the Note 4 or S6/S6 Edge behave under those circumstances…

      • Daggett Beaver

        My Note 4 only gets hot if it’s been on the wireless charger for a while. It doesn’t get hot when I play 3D games, but I don’t play often enough or long enough to be certain it’s always true for everyone. If I play a 3D game on my old Galaxy S3, it roasts.

      • Peter Mulders

        Of course I update my phone whenever I can!

    • Jeremiah Washburn

      My g flex 2 does not get as hot as my nexus 5 did and have not noticed any throttling issues so maybe the issue is with HTC

      • NorgesGlasset

        No.. It’s a normal problem on the G Flex 2 also as you can see in the test…. But SOME work better than others

        • Jeremiah Washburn

          I am aware of the tests but what i am providing is my results from real world use. I think the issues in the test come from artificially high use of the CPU whereas in real life the CPU will very rarely go full bore for more than a minute or two. But then again i don’t playgames that are all that intensive on my phone just COC and hearthstone.

          • Chikiko Saotome

            this is sadly not true. i’ve been having horrible performance issues. For the last hour or so i was just texting a friend intermittently. the battery temp was high and it was super slow. i opened cpu-z and found out 4 of my processors were stopped! i had to power off the device for it to start working well again. and it wasn’t really doing anything

  • btank4evr

    The 810 was a disgrace for the company.

    • dcdttu

      I don’t think LG and HTC are too keen on it either. Too bad there’s basically a monopoly in the mobile processor world today.

      • Harvie Boles

        Intel, ARM, MIPS…

        And a bunch of branches.

        • dcdttu

          Non Qualcomm is, what? 5% of phones before the GS6. Maybe?

          • Svnjay

            Then it’s not a monopoly.

      • Geoffroy GUERITOT

        I may add that the 810 is a consequence of the ubiquity of Qualcomm.

      • Awesome guy

        Nvidia just doesn’t want to compete in this market, they would put out a lower wattage mobile processor, they are just too busy with self driving cars.

    • Tyler Durden

      digraice to da famirry!!

  • TRSHD

    As an owner of a M9, I think this hardware revision from Qualcomm could warrant a class action. Coming from Canada, I still haven’t received the latest software update from HTC (the one released last week in EU and Asia), but for now, my phone runs so hot that I don’t give more than a year life expectancy… I’m so tired of major corporations dumping half baked products on the market knowing that there’s almost no recourse against them.

    • Bob Marley

      If it doesn’t last a year, there’s a warranty. Companies have no obligation to push out good products, just like you have no obligation to buy them.

      • BriniaSona

        It’s an android thing. Every owner just wants the highest specs, the best, the best. This mans that companies will just pump out half-baked optimized products just to meet demand. BB10 and iOS are still using what would be 2013 specs in their phones and those phones run circles around most android phone with top end specs. (I’m not talking about benchmarking, this is day to day usage). I have to restart the M9 every once and a while, where as my BlackBerry Classic can go for almost a month before I reset that (not sure about iPhone).

        Android OEM’s need to focus more on optimizing Android to their phone rather than pushing next years specs and hoping the great specs make up for the lack of optimization.

        • Bob Marley

          My Nexus 5 IS from 2013 and doesn’t need to be restarted daily. My Nexus 7 2013 runs rings around my iPad 4 in both performance and stability. iOS releases have become bugfests with fixes coming six months later (iOS 7 and 8). Nexus devices are incredibly optimized and both of mine are faster than they were the day I got them.

          • tiger

            Bullcrap! N5 camera bug that drained battery was not fixed in OVER one year!

            Critical iOS fix are within one month OR LESS.

            Has Android fix memory leak?? How long has it been? Lollipop was introduced in November 2014…and we’re in JUNE 2015….

            Just saying…don’t throw stones when you live in a glass house!

          • Bob Marley

            Never had a camera bug that drained battery on the Nexus 5. iOS 7 was released in September 2013. It was quite obviously unstable, crashed and laggy on my iPad 4; this wasn’t fixed until March 2014 with iOS 7.1. The same pattern of events occurred with iOS 8. It seems like custom keyboards were too much for Apple to handle.

          • tiger

            Yeah, ok…dude, don’t lie.

          • Brian Morrison

            Not every N5 owner suffered from that bug, in my case I saw it exactly once with Android 5.0x and it didn’t reappear.

            Apple have had their problems too, it comes with the territory and is essentially impossible to avoid with the wide variations in usage and apps installed. All OSs are vulnerable to implementation errors.

          • tiger

            But, it does NOT take Apple over 8 months (maybe or not) to fix something as critical as memory leak!! (No evidence that memory leak was fix with 5.1.1) Nor does it take over 12 freaking months to fix a camera bug that drains battery!

            Again, critical updates usually take at most 1-2 months for Apple to fix.

          • Brian Morrison

            I will admit that Google have been slow in too many instances, however there is currently a major security hole in iOS that Apple have known about for 8 months and as yet there is no fix. It allows apps to bypass all the memory sandboxing and read just about any data without leaving a trace.

            Everyone needs to up their game to avoid these types of problems, but it is non trivial to do that.

          • tiger

            Major security hole that has NOT hit ONE user. How many users got hit by memory leak?

          • Brian Morrison

            Apple couldn’t have known that 8 months ago.

            The memory leaks have been a pain, but they didn’t have a really bad effect except on a few occasions. It wasn’t one leak either, there were several different ones. Not every user was affected the same way.

            I am very happy with my N5, my son likes his iPhone 6, neither of us has been badly inconvenienced but neither experience has been perfect.

          • tiger

            My iPhone 5s (same age as your N5) is still being supported by Sprint (carrier)…your N5 end of life was last November.
            My iPhone 5s (and your son’s iPhone 6) has true software and hardware encryption that fully protects my data. Your N5, even after factory reset, can still let its data be exposed.

          • Brian Morrison

            My N5 is going to receive Android M in a few months’ time, I don’t see that as unsupported.

            I expect the next generation of Android phones to encrypt their contents a lot better, but security is a complex subject and concentrating on any one part of the puzzle without ensuring everything is equally well designed won’t help in the end. Even Apple managed to ship SSL certificate checking code that ignored the result of the comparison and always accepted every certificate presented.

            I have no problem with people choosing Apple products, but I do hope that people are realistic in their assessment of what is important to them and whether their choice provides them with an adequate experience.

          • tiger

            Just as we speak today, i got a Sprint carrier update on my iPhone 5s to update their frequency profile. Nexus 5? Sprint stop updating their software last November 2014. Yes, you still get Android updates, but the carrier side is end of life over 8 months ago.

            Being realistic is much needed among you guys. Google services lack end-to-end encryption (Hangout, Gmail, etc.). Android phones lack adequate encryption. iOS fixed most (if not all) critical flaws within one month if not sooner.

            Activation Lock on iOS actually does what it say. Can you say the same about Android Device Manager?

          • Drygin

            Tiger, Apple is definitely the best dude. Is this what you wanted to read ?
            Iphone and IOS are the best : they bring you lot security and unbreakable encryption (though we know it does not exist)… it makes you change chargers and docks with every phone release (but come on this just costs 50 bucks, I’m sooo greedy)… Iphone will die after 10 hours of moderate use (but, hey guy, bring your charger to work, idiot)… Iphone needs Itunes to copy my music (OK, so I install Itunes on my Laptop and kick out 1Gb RAM from it)… Iphone can’t send or receive stuff from other phones (this is for you security, you idiot !)… You still need to make a Jailbrake to send bluetooth pics (Apple doesn’t want me to do that, because it’s baaaaaad )… Iphone does have no SD Card slot, (so when you run out of space, buy the next Iphone with few extra gigas)… Iphone is far the most expensive phone here (Come on, you got to pay for all these aweful specs and features I listed )
            Conclusion : Iphone is simply the best. Yes, the best SCAM out there

            So continue enjoying your encryption on the Iphone… when you’ll wake up you’ll find a lot of your pics stolen from Icloud as it happend to lot of people before…
            Where’s your privacy ? Where’s security ? Where’s end-to-end encryption ? OH MY GOD !!!

          • Evan Willis

            Oh Noes! Sprint doesn’t update its shitty apps on my Nexus! The one thing I had a fucking Nexus for! Oh the horror!

          • tiger

            Hint: it is not about Sprint apps. Cellular update moron! Apple iPhone does NOT have any Sprint apps on it.

          • Evan Willis

            Who the hell cares about carrier updates on a nexus? Updates come straight from Google, not Sprint

          • tiger

            Hush please. You’re embarrassing yourself! smh

            THINK before speaking/typing next time.

          • Evan Willis

            I’m embarassing myself by making legitimate points? If you say so

          • tiger

            BTW, the flaw has been fixed. Apple asked researcher to not publish result for 6 mos so that Apple can fix it on server side…and it fixed it BEFORE the results were published!!

          • PlanetVaster

            Tiger Shut your fucking Isheep mouth and go comment on an Apple tech news site, because your obviously an idiot apple fanboy who doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

          • tiger

            Really? Prove me wrong phandroid.

          • PlanetVaster

            I don’t have to everyone else’s replies rekt you and you have only been embarrassing yourself with your wrong information, I don’t have time to deal with you trolls so I won’t reply to you anymore,I just want to make sure people have the correct information so I want people to know your wrong

          • tiger

            Yup as expected…you are just an ignorant phandroid.

          • Evan Willis

            Do you even know what a memory leak is? It’s easy to figure out if its fixed. Close all your apps, then open the Overview

          • tiger

            So, your Samsung is fixed? What update was that that fixed it?

          • Evan Willis

            If you wan to get technical, 5.0.2
            Everyone forgets that that update was techincally the first to fix that problem, even if only as a temporary solution
            But Samsung didn’t do that, they just went straight from 5.0, to 5.1,1
            (I have a Nexus 7, btw)

          • Evan Willis

            Oh sorry, Want**.Happy?

          • tiger

            BTW, google acknowledge the camera bug…and promised the fix…was not fixed until OVER ONE YEAR LATER!

          • tiger

            BTW, once Android have true encryption get back to me! Oh wait, they tried and failed miserably! Still no “fix”. LOL.

          • Benjamin Walburn

            Android does have encryption, and had it for a while. I don’t know what you’ve been told.

          • tiger

            Not on same level as Apple which encrypts via software and hardware.

            Android encryption is painfully slow and impractical.

            But then again,factory reset does not erase nor protect your data with Android!!!!

            Android = privacy joke!

          • Benjamin Walburn

            Android does have hardware encryption. Are you confusing android as a whole with the nexus line? Even if you are, you’re still wrong, as the Nexus 6 is very fast even with software encryption.

          • tiger

            Nexus 6 with encryption is as slow as a 2011-2012 phone…per ARSTECHNICA.

            And here is a problem…even after factory reset and encryption, a thief can still recover DATA from your phone!!! Oh yeah, encryption working great here! What a joke! Basically, never sell your Android phone on eBay…just burn it to ashes…that is the ONLY way to protect your data!

            But then again, your data is already been sold by Google since Google services have no end-to-end encryption!!

          • Benjamin Walburn

            Nexus 6 isn’t slow by any means. It isn’t as slow as an old phone, it had a slower r/w speed, which means it takes a little longer to copy large files. There’s no excise for your ignorance.

            You can’t recover data from a wiped phone that was encrypted. You can recover data from a wiped unencrypted android just as easily as an unencrypted iPhone.

            Google doesn’t sell data, moron.

          • tiger

            http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/05/flawed-android-factory-reset-leaves-crypto-and-login-keys-ripe-for-picking/

            https://blog.avast.com/2014/07/08/tens-of-thousands-of-americans-sell-themselves-online-every-day/

            “One of the most concerning findings is that data users presume has been wiped during reset in many cases can be recovered and read even when a phone has been protected with full-disk encryption.”

            Ouch!!! Ignorance runs deep with you!

          • Benjamin Walburn

            Oh, and it wasn’t overlooked that you showed up and started trolling right after the biggest security flaw in the history of iOS was unveiled. Classic bully: you try to compensate for a perceived weakness by trying to hurt others. Stupid child.

          • tiger

            Biggest flaw that has affected NO ONE?

          • Benjamin Walburn

            Last I checked there were a few million users of iOS and OSX. Not hardly “no one”.

          • tiger

            But, again, has it affected ONE person? Answer that.

          • Benjamin Walburn

            So you want to play that game? A bit hypocritical, seeing as nobody has been affected by the factory reset flaw you were just ignorantly trumpeting.

          • tiger

            LOL…hypocritical is when you call it the biggest flaw yet not ONE person has been affected.

          • Benjamin Walburn

            You’re on the internet, I suggest that you google words that you don’t understand.

          • tiger

            BTW, the flaw has been fixed. Apple asked researcher to not publish result for 6 mos so that Apple can fix it on server side…and it fixed it BEFORE the results were published!!!!

          • tiger

            Btw for iOS, simply setup passcode automatically encrypt your iPhone. Not additional step nor any slowdown. True native software and hardware encryption.

          • Benjamin Walburn

            Prior to iOS 8, it was a partial encryption. Not that it matters. Apple implementing encryption differently does not mean Android does not have encryption. Idiot.

            And I don’t know what you’re ouching about. A security flaw in a legacy Android version. Did you know that Windows 95 has security flaws too? Talk about ignorance. Stupid troll.

          • tiger

            Are you so sure that Lollipop fixed that flaw??????

            Kitkat is legacy? Remind me…isn’t Kitkat still #1 popularity Android software?

          • Benjamin Walburn

            Who’s talking about kitkat? The flaw affects up to 4.3 Jelly Bean, according to your article.

          • tiger

            “Recovery of the data (in Lollipop) could still be possible but the offline cracking attack would have to occur on the device to take advantage of the TEE key. It would take longer but conceivably would still be possible (especially for short and purely numerical pins). “

          • Benjamin Walburn

            What’s this? You can brute force your way past encryption? Stop the press!

          • tiger

            No need for brute…TEE key is what is needed. Brute won’t work on iOS. Once Activation LOCK on iOS is activated, there is no brute force that can break it.

          • Benjamin Walburn

            Your quote described brute force attacking. How is it not necessary when it plainly says that it does.

            All encryption can be broken by brute force. The time frame is the only problem.

          • tiger

            Not on iOS.

          • Charles7

            ummm. . . . . Nexus 6 Vs iPhone 6 Vs Note 4. . . . speed test, iPhone 6 comes in last. . . . and is pushing the least amount of pixels. . .

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DV2X51kAVfc

          • tiger

            Comparing apps speed on different platforms…yeah ok…. smh

          • Charles7

            It’s all about the “user experience”

          • tiger

            Here’s the thing…high-end games (e.g. Asphalt 8, Modern Combat 5, etc.) are way more detailed with superior graphics on iOS than Android counterpart. So, again, you’re comparing app usage in two different platforms.

          • Charles7

            If the user wants a faster phone….. And you’ve been going on and on about how slow the nexus is which makes the iPhone…what? 2009?

            Maybe sick with the adjustment of, each does things different and the iPhone had its positives where it excels, as do other devices…. And drop the ridiculous hyperbole.

          • tiger

            But then again, the HD graphics on iOS may not run at all on Android devices.

            Link: http://www.gamebench.net/blog/iphone-6-vs-galaxy-s6-which-performs-best-gaming

          • Charles7

            Only twats stuck in their mom’s basement care about mobile games…….Move on!

          • Brian Morrison

            It’s not too difficult to sort it out with Android, after a factory reset simply encrypt the phone storage and then perform a second factory reset. IIRC Ross Anderson et al suggest this in their paper explaining the vulnerability

          • Cakefish

            5.1.1 fixed memory leak.

          • tiger

            How long did it take? 8 months? Does everyone have 5.1.1?

            But, then again, from Android changelog, there is NO mention of fix. And some (most?) folks still suffer from it.

          • Cakefish

            Took ages yes, but all Nexus devices have the update now. Completely solved the memory leak on my Nexus 5, which was really bad on 5.0, 5.0.1 and 5.1.

          • tiger

            Are you sure? No changelog. I still read reports of memory leak post 5.1.1.

          • Cakefish

            Well, my I have yet to encounter a single home launcher redraw, untimely background app crash, major slowdowns etc. since the update. Those happened very often on 5.0, 5.0.1 and 5.1, forcing me to restart the phone almost daily. Now I don’t need to restart anymore. So it’s definitely fixed in my case, at least.

          • Karly Johnston

            My N7 2013 navigation is fast but Chrome page loads have become a lag fest and battery life dropped 2hrs SoT after Lollipop and never got better.

          • Bob Marley

            Chrome is still smooth for me. Try using Chrome Beta or increasing its RAM allocation. I’m impressed by this two year old device.

          • Karly Johnston

            Once the page is loaded it is fine, but it takes forever to load and changing the memory flags won’t help that.

        • Karly Johnston

          Your Blackberry Classic can a month between resets? The Passport can’t go two days without rebooting itself.

        • dcdttu

          I would be perfectly happy with the SD 808 in the next Nexus, rather than this overheating monster. Honestly, a little software cleanup and optimization and you would have almost identical performance.

    • neo905

      The new firmware in an effort to keep the thermal heat to a minimum while charging now makes charging so brutally slow it renders the phone useless. I wouldn’t be in such a hurry to get it if I were you.

    • Sam Lee

      Sorry, dude. Revisions and remediations don’t constitute admissions of guilt in US common law. Practically speaking, you may be right, but in legal policy, enforcing that common sense, would discourage manufacturers from releasing remediations or revisions on product defects they know they could fix..

  • RG

    Qualcomm really do need to get the 820 right. Otherwise the 810 won’t be considered a blip and customers will lose faith in them.

    • RG

      It’s interesting why they didn’t call this ‘revised v2’ chip the 811

      • Cool

        Well. That would make it even more noticeable that there was a problem with the original chip.

        Also it would break with their normal naming conventions. So they definitely wouldn’t do it that way.

        • RG

          I thought that too.. But they could have swept the bedraggled 810 under the carpet and put the 811 in the shop window, a la 800/801

    • tiger

      Qualcomm got caught with their pants down when Apple introduced A7 chip 2 years ago…and rushed a ARMv8 chip to market without proper R&D.

  • Wjdzm

    Heh Samsung’s decision to go with their owe SoC wasn’t just an “excuse” after all.

    • Brian Morrison

      The difficulty Qualcomm has is that their design is on a 28nm process, that means more heat for a given clock speed. Samsung are using a 14nm process, reducing heat generated and die area.

      Qualcomm will move to the smaller geometry process with their next generation, TSMC have a working process on this node which will be in production soon.

      • KenanSadhu

        S810 is on the 20nm process. When it throttles more than a 28nm krait cores, you know that the design is flawed.

      • Wjdzm

        Last time I read about Qualcomm’s manufacturer, Samsung was going to take most of their order… or was it Apple?

  • Siralf

    Be done with the 810 already, roll on with the punches and design a proper 64-bit processor

  • 404

    That’s why I like Nvidia better. Plus they make better graphics cards right?

  • Tricky

    Why is every Android company so blind! I mean, how hard is it to come up with some idea to cool the processor and battery down? With the way phones are completely sealed off and thin as hell, im sure there could be a way to use the body to dissipate heat better. Instead, in every phone there is barely even any thermal paste. Let alone a tiny heat sync. Would you take the radiator out of you car, and wonder why it overheats 10 min down the road? And instead of putting one in, you just don’t rev past 1000 rpm…

    It does suck the HTC and Sony have been plagued by this processor, but blame doesn’t rest on Qualcomm only. Do something about it like Samsung you blind fools!

    Crossing my fingers for oneplus 2, they have promised its fixed. Also crossing my finger for the snapdragon 820. It better be better then the 810 if the one plus doesn’t work out.

    • Charles7

      This is one of the problems, OEMs don’t even try to dissipate heat. However, they don’t try because 99.9% of users won’t ever notice the problem and/or won’t think about it if they do notice anything. Only those who read sites like this know what’s going on. Ask the average user what “thermal throttling” is and see the blank stares back at you.

      The reality is, for most “average users” the S810 is fine because they only use their phone intermittently, thus thermal throttling rarely kicks in for them.

      Nonetheless, one wold think a $600+ flagship device should be designed better for heavy users. I, personally, am skipping this whole generation of SoC. . . waiting to see the next generation of devices.

      • Tricky

        I agree, on the flip side I have not met a person yet who cares about screen resolution, thinness or processing power in 2 years. That has platuaed, and priorities have changed. Bigger battery, a phone that doesn’t heat up and a screen that won’t crack are number 1 now. Clash of clans proves a huge ammount of people are playing cellphone games. What happens to the 99% is their phone just shuts off and they can’t understand why. Plus playing games while charging = heat dissaster …

        My major issue with it is, how much faster these phones could be with active cooling. Imaging if you could keep your phone on its max GHz and not worry about heat. I put my nexus 5 on performance and my antutu is 45k, in comparison, out of the box 35k. The numbers don’t mean anything, but on performance my phone is noticeable quicker. Keeping the battery cool improves battery life and longevity! Those are 2015 features, faster processing and resolution are old news. No one gets it and would rather guess until their company is about to go out of business!

        PS on the XDA forum there is a tutorial on how to add a heat sync to a nexus 5. You take the phone apart and add a mm thin peice of copper with thermal paste on top of the processor. It adds no thickness to the phone and noticeable dissipates heat better. Unfortunately this mod brings to much heat to the LCD screen in turn shortening its life and being counter productive… But if built from the ground up it would have worked.

    • Mr Mop

      There isn’t a whole lot of room to slap a heatsink in, unless they make the whole phone metal (like the M9) and have that act as a heatsink. That’s what Apple does with its iMacs, I think.

  • Totally would love to see Intel processors in flagship smartphones

  • Abd

    Samsung Exynos is the king

  • Brian

    The writer does not have a clue about what he is talking about. There is no 810 Version 2.1 chip. It is EXACTLY the same chip with a software update called 2.1. The architecture is not different. Ask Qualcomm. They will tell you categorically there is only one model. Android “Authority” my arse. :D

  • Sam Lee

    So that throttling chart means that the 808 runs far more consistently under load than the 810 v2? Just want to confirm bc I’m considering the Moto X Pure.

  • john garrabrandt

    What really sucks is that the newest Google Nexus 6P is using this processor. This is the only reason i didn’t, and won’t, pre-order this phone. I want to wait for some legit reviews first.

  • Javed Aslam

    My eyes are on Nexus 6P the latest victim of the 810…Is there an improvement regarding the heating issue ?