At CES 2017, we got to see how Amazon’s Alexa digital assistant is getting incorporated into a ton of different current and upcoming smart products. During the show we also got a chance to see a demo of how Alexa, combined with a smart hub from Intel, could be used in a tiny 210 square foot home.

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Yes, the small home trend that you may have seen on TV shows like Tiny House Nation on HGTV made it to CES last week. In this case, Intel used their version of a tiny home to show how a number of things could be controlled with voice commands. With an Amazon Echo connected speaker and an Intel smart hub, we got to see how a potential owner of this small house could control the lights, locks and even the BMW parked outside with voice commands.

The Intel smart home hub will allow the owner of this tiny house to issue more complex commands that will activate multiple devices at once. For example, saying just one command will put the house in a “movie time” mode. The blinds went down, the lights were turned off and a screen also came down. Finally, a TV projector was turned on so you could begin your home theater experience.

If you were sleeping and woke up to begin your day in this small home, you could say, “Hey Alexa, turn on Good Morning”. The blinds would then come back up, lights would turn on, the thermostat would raise the temperature and even your morning tea kettle would start heating up water.

All of this showed how people with a bunch of connected smart devices could get them to work together in combination with Alexa and Intel’s hub. It’s something that would have been shown in a sci-fi movie just a few years ago but is now a reality, and we suspect more and more homes, in tiny, normal and large sizes, will incorporate this technology in the next few years.

What are your impressions of this tiny smart home shown at CES 2017? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

John Callaham
John was a newspaper reporter before becoming a technology and video/PC gaming writer in 2000. He lives in Greer, SC with his wife and five cats.