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Windows 10 gets three more years of life, but only if you pay up

You will get monthly security patches for critical security issues, but only if you subscribe to an annual license.
By
December 6, 2023
Windows 10
Aamir Siddiqui / Android Authority
TL;DR
  • Microsoft has announced an Extended Security Update program for Windows 10 for businesses and individuals.
  • Under this program, the company will provide critical security updates monthly through an annual subscription, likely to be available per seat.
  • The license can be renewed for three years. Pricing has not been disclosed yet.

Windows 11 is the latest operating system for desktops and laptops running on Windows, but Windows 10 remains popular. Windows 10 will be supported until October 14, 2025, with security patches, and that is when many users will decide to upgrade to Windows 11. If you still want to continue sticking with Windows 10 and still want security updates, then Microsoft has a way out for you, provided you can pay up.

Microsoft is now offering individuals the option to subscribe to Windows 10’s Extended Security Update (ESU) program, as highlighted by ArsTechnica. While technical details for the same are not available, the ESU program for businesses allows organizations to purchase a yearly subscription that can be renewed for three years. Devices enrolled in the ESU will receive monthly security updates for Windows 10. In the past, Microsoft has offered per-seat licenses for ESU.

Microsoft has not yet provided pricing details for businesses and individuals. However, the company highlights that the ESU only includes critical and important security updates. It does not include any new features, design change requests, or customer-requested non-security updates. Even technical support beyond the ESU is not available from the company.

In short, you’d be better off upgrading to Windows 11 unless you really cannot (and have money to spare for that decision). Windows 11 does have additional hardware requirements that may not be feasible for some users. Such use cases still have almost ten months to figure their way forward. There may even be some users who aren’t upgrading out of personal choice. To them, we say, Windows 11 isn’t that bad, and there’s a chance you may end up liking it.