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LG really wants to show off the strict quality tests that its new flagship goes through. After all, the V20 is advertised with military-grade impact resistance as one of its selling points. And after the Galaxy Note 7 fiasco, quality control is becoming increasingly scrutinized.

In Peyongtaek, South Korea, LG gave a glimpse of how the V20 is made from assembly to inspection in an organized press tour. According to the company, the V20 met all of its 60,000 validation tests before mass production, and this is where this “military-grade impact resistance” comes from.

LG conducts its hardware validation on the third floor of the G2 production line, where all of its smartphones, tablets, and wearables go through extensive testing to ensure top quality. According to Kim Kyun-heung, the person who oversees the quality tests at this facility, LG uses a steel bar to test V20’s durability:

We conduct various kinds of tests on all parts of the device, including the touch screen, before its mass production. We drop the device onto the steel bar, as the material is considered the hardest when conducting drop tests.

On top of that, LG conducts multiple one-meter drop tests on the device’s edges in order to improve hardware stability and to determine if there is any structural defect. Other “torture” tests include dropping a steel ball onto the display to see how a person’s weight would affect the screen.

Once the hardware tests are completed, the V20 is transferred to the multifunction integrated test system, which examines the phablet’s user interfaces. Once it’s cleared, the phone is tested manually by one of the workers for touch sensitivity, and lastly, the company tests the phone’s radio frequencies. As you can see, the V20 endures extensive quality assurance tests, so this brings us to the ultimate question: “If LG’s phones go through such extensive testing, what is up with the boot loop debacle?”

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