Make your own Android-controlled robot

by: John DyeJanuary 20, 2016
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Ever wanted to learn how to build and program a robot, but you didn’t really know where to start? One inventive subscription service wants to take all the hassle out of this process and have you designing and building your own robots as soon as possible. It’s called Thimble, and it’s trying to become a one-stop-shop for persons of any age looking to become more tech-savvy and inventive.

To those familiar with Blue Apron, a subscription service that delivers ingredients and recipes to your doorstep to ease the less kitchen-inclined of us into the culinary arts, the concept of Thimble will seem familiar. The company delivers kits to build and program a variety of electronic devices ranging from robots to quadcopters.

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Everything you need comes in an orange box delivered straight to your door, as well as a set of tutorials and instructions that you’ll need to make this month’s gadget a reality. That’s right: you’ll get a new project every single month.

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For those who thrive with competition, Thimble will also include a monthly competition that encourages subscribers to mod-out their builds using their newly acquired skills and submit their innovations for review by a panel of judges assembled from Upverter, Intel, AT&T Foundry, Autodesk, and Hackster.io. Winners will receive hardware prizes and the ego-boost of being featured on the main website.

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The Kickstarter for Thimble, which still has 17 days to go, originally only asked for a humble $25,000 to put their idea into motion. Interest in a service like this seems pretty high, seeing as so far the team has crowdsourced nearly 10 times what they were asking for (the current pledged amount as of writing is $232,455)!

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Although not every project will see subscribers interacting with the Android operating system, it seemed remiss not to let our tech-loving readers in on this cool project. The team says their kits are best for ages 13 and up since soldering is involved, and it seems like these would make pretty awesome parent-child projects for energetic young minds.

Coding in coffee shopSee also: Why everyone should learn to code8

What are your thoughts regarding Thimble’s build-your-own-robot delivery service? Seem like something you might be interested in? Let us know in the comments below, and be sure to check out the Kickstarter campaign for more information!

Next: 10 best 3D games for Android