Latest

Tegra K1

Nvidia has unveiled the latest member of its Tegra mobile processor lineup. Here’s an in-depth look at the Nvidia Tegra K1 and what it means for mobile devices.

samsung-exynos-5-dual

Samsung has just released the whitepaper for their long-awaited Exynos 5250 SoC, now called the Exynos 5 Dual, and there’s a lot of interesting information to be discovered in it. The Exynos 5 Dual will be the world’s first Cortex A15-based chip, when it will ship later this year, presumably inside the 11.8-inch tablet Samsung is going to launch later this year. Samsung had to wait for this A15-based chip to support the very high WQXGA (2560×1600) resolution of the Galaxy Tab 11.6. Some of the most important features of the newly unveiled Exynos 5250 are: Dual-core 1.7 Ghz Cortex…

galaxy-tab-11.6

When the Crysis FPS game came out on the PC in 2007, it pushed the boundaries of what gaming graphics should look like. The “Can it run Crysis?” catchphrase became an Internet meme, a question asked whenever a new CPU or GPU is announced. ARM hardware has been evolving at an amazing pace, with the performance of mobile GPUs doubling every 12 months. Low-power ARM chips are very close to surpassing the current gen consoles, in terms of performance and gaming visuals. Crytek, the company behind Crysis, seems to agree that, if the next-gen PS4 and Xbox720 won’t come soon,…

ESLookback

The OpenGL ES 2.0 specification has been finalized since 2007, but we didn’t get to use it in smartphones until 2009, when the iPhone and Android phones started supporting it in hardware. It still feels like a long time for the OpenGL ES specification to be updated, though. But the wait is over, as Khronos, the group responsible for OpenGL, OpenCL, OpenVL (augmented reality) and other open standards, has finally announced that the OpenGL ES 3.0 specification has been ratified. The OpenGL ES 3.0 specification is largely an implementation of the desktop version of OpenGL 3.3, with some other features…

2012-07-30 16.36.36_575px

The GLBenchmark is now the standard benchmarking tool to compare mobile GPUs. We’re going to see a GLBenchmark 3.0 this fall with all the necessary tests for the new OpenGL ES 3.0 standard, but until then, we get a significantly improved GLBenchmark 2.5 version. The new version still tests only OpenGL 2.0 features, but does it in a much more aggressive way, leaving even the latest mobile GPUs struggling to achieve 15 FPS in most tests, let alone 30 FPS. Considering that GLBenchmark 3.0 is just a few months away, and will probably arrive before any of the OpenGL ES…

glb3splash

OpenGL ES 2.0 is a lighter version of the desktop OpenGL 2.0 (which is quite old), and stripped of the features that would consume too much power. It then attempts to maintain the perfect balance between visual graphics and battery efficiency for the remaining ones. Keep in mind that the OpenGL ES 2.0 was finished about 5 years ago, and back then the high-end chips used to be the ARMv6 GPU’s and CPU’s like the ARM11 we see now in the lowest end Android smartphones! But with the latest GPU’s that can support incredibly high resolutions, while still keeping the power…