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Craig Barratt's Access and Energy group gains prominence at Google

Google's interests in renewable energy and networking infrastructure have gained a bump in importance with the increased visibility of Craig Barratt, the senior vice president of its Access and Energy group.
By
June 24, 2014
google solar energy
Although the majority of Google’s revenue comes from adverts, which are displayed as part of its various Internet services like Search, Gmail and YouTube, the tech giant also has its fingers in several other pies including mobile (with Android), wearables (with Google Glass and Android Wear), and home automation (with Nest). The company also has interests in renewable energy and networking infrastructure. These last two categories have recently gained a bump in importance at Mountain View with the increased visibility of Craig Barratt, the senior vice president of its Access and Energy group.

Craig, who came to Google in 2013 from Wi-Fi specialist Atheros – where he was president and CEO, has been given greater prominence on Google’s management team web page. Barratt is now listed a part of the “Senior Leadership” alongside the likes of Sundar Pichai, Senior Vice President for Android, Chrome & Apps; and Susan Wojcicki, Senior Vice President for YouTube.

Larry Page is increasingly serious about Google's role in providing means of renewable energy and better Internet access across the globe.
Barratt, who has a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford, is probably taking charge of Google’s various energy and infrastructure projects including Google Fiber, a fiber-to-the-home service in the US that offers Internet access at gigabit speeds; Project Loon, a balloon/drone-based mesh Internet service; Project Link, a project that is laying fiber backbone in Uganda; Mankai Power, an airborne wind turbine project designed to generate more energy with lower cost than conventional wind systems; as well as all of Google renewable energy projects which come under Google Green.

It is likely that Craig’s remit will also include Google’s rumored $1 billion investment in 180 small, high capacity satellites that will extend Internet access to additional under-served areas of the world.

By adding Craig Barratt to the so-called “L team”, Google’s top advisers to its chief executive Larry Page, means that Page is increasingly serious about Google’s role in providing means of renewable energy and better Internet access across the globe.