Virgin Mobile Says No to Rooting

June 15, 2011
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Last week, Virgin Mobile impressed us Android lovers through by stating publicly that they wish to offer a “pure Android experience” on their devices and prefers them to be Android virgins. In other words, they don’t want any UI skins on their devices.

A spokesperson from Virgin Mobile even said:

“Virgin Mobile USA aims to make available devices that allow the end user to have the freedom to customize the device to their liking. We like to take a consistent approach with our Android portfolio and so we prefer to have the true Android experience loaded on all our Android phones.”

An impressive statement, that certainly made us smile, especially considering the way other carriers have acted in recent times. Still, there’s more: Virgin Mobile turned our smiles into frowns when they said that they are totally against rooting because, according to them, it is a violation of their terms of  service.

In my own humble opinion, we have the liberty to choose, and it is our personal right to gain root access to our devices if we want. After all, we own them, right? Virgin Mobile believes that because users employ their network, that they have the final verdict over what devices can do and what limitations are subsequently imposed.

“We do not endorse in any way end users using a non-officially tested operating system nor do we approve of ‘rooting’ devices. This constitutes a violation of our terms of service and puts our network in jeopardy. We endeavor to provide users a customizable Android experience within the limits of the tested and network approved Android OS.”

Yes, it is a sad fact that some carriers simply don’t like rooting, but none have ever been this frank and straightforward. Anyway, there’s little Virgin Mobile can do to prevent or stop users from rooting their devices. Nevertheless, it’s slightly disgraceful that they would rebuke the efforts of digital freedom lovers.

What do you guys think about Virgin Mobile’s behavior? Hit us up in the comments.

Source: PC Mag

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