Merger Scrutiny

If allowed to merge, Comcast would therefore controls nearly 40 percent of the U.S. broadband market and provide cable to almost a third of American homes. But of course, Comcast and Time Warner Cable say that this is not anti-competitive and is in the public interest. Time Warner Cable CEO Robert Marcus One listed so-called competitors of Comcast and Time Warner Cable and put mobile networks high on the list

Sprint Unlimited Data

Sprint is soon going to be throttling their heaviest users in the company’s most congested areas. Customers of both Sprint’s postpaid and prepaid services, as well as their Boost Mobile and Virgin Moobile prepaid brands, are receiving notifications from the company informing them they’ll soon face a new prioritization management scheme.

FCC Seal Emblem

A total of 145 companies including Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon, DropBox, and Yahoo issued a joint statement to FCC boss Tom Wheeler for his proposal to protect network neutrality by destroying it. The letter is not only signed by more than 100 Internet companies but also by two of five commissioners of the Federal Communications Commission. In the letter, the companies take issue with Chairman Tom Wheeler’s plan to regulate broadband providers

Bigstock Poor Customer Service

Consumer Reports routinely shows that cell phone service providers are one of, if not the, worst in terms of customer satisfaction rankings. While Sprint now occupies last place in the latest Consumer Reports survey, AT&T has consistently been dead last in recent years. In fact, Consumer Reports has found that the cell phone provider with the highest marks was prepaid operator Consumer Cellular.

NSA Logo

In their first-ever transparency reports, Verizon and AT&T combined received an equivalent of 1.2 requests every minute: AT&T reported receiving 301,816 requests for user data from state, local and federal authorities. Verizon reported receiving 321,545 requests for user data from state, local and federal authorities.

Verizon Wireless

Verizon has decided to follow in AT&T’s footsteps and stamp its feet about the restrictions that the FCC is going to put in place to save some chunks of spectrum for smaller operators. Verizon used similar arguments as AT&T by stating that the rules limiting hoarding by the companies with the deepest pockets was “perverse and unjust” and “subsidizing.”