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FTC Mobile Apps for Kids - Disclosures Still Not Making the Grade

A new report by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) says that many of the apps which are designed for children collect data about the devices the kids are using without informing parents. The apps, which are available for Android via Google’s Play Store and for iOS via Apple’s iTunes app store, send information from the mobile device to ad networks, analytics companies, or other third parties.

apple-vs-google

FTC says that the ban the Google requested would be harmful to consumers, and it would also damage innovation and result in increased costs and uncertainty for other companies. In a statement, the Commission said that using SEP-based injunctions against competitors is equivalent to a ‘patent hold up’.

google-search

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has two investigations opened on Google’s business practices. One of the concerns Google’s Search business, the company’s main revenue stream, and the other is related to Google’s use of standard-essential smartphone patents in legal battles against some of its main rivals.

Motorola-Mobility-and-google-logo

Google has been under fire from various government agencies around the world lately who are investigating antitrust lawsuits against the company. Now Google is said to be considering whether to settle with U.S. authorities over how it has handled its mobile patents.

google search

It seems Google is not off the hook in the Federal Trade Commission’s investigation into whether the company violated antitrust laws in prioritizing its own services in search results. The FTC intends to decide by year-end whether it will pursue legal action against Google for anti-competitive practices.

kids-app

Today, the FTC has required both Apple and Android to do more in protecting the apps their young consumers buy for their mobile devices. FTC has examined a number of mobile apps intended for children and sold through both the Apple App Store and the Android Marketplace. Out of this number, FTC examined 8,000 iOS apps and 3,800 Android apps. The researchers put in charge of this were able to discover that in almost all of these apps, there was no way for parents to tell the type of information being collected by the app maker; as well as how…