tower

AT&T, America’s second largest wireless operator, owns 30 MHz of spectrum in the so called “WCS band”. Translation: 2.3 GHz. They’ve been wanting to use that spectrum to deploy 4G LTE for a while now, but they’ve faced opposition from Sirius XM, a satellite radio company that uses the same band to run their service.

LG_Optimus-G

We were pretty surprised to see the rumored LG Nexus get FCC certified before the official LG Optimus G, but now the world harmony has been restored. We have no way to know for sure that the E975 spotted at FCC is the same phone as the G, but all hints seem to point at it being the AT&T version of the “beast”.

Kindle Fire HD

When Amazon announced its new range of Kindle Fire tablets last month, among them was its first device with mobile broadband. The high-end Kindle Fire HD 8.9″ 4G LTE can connect to AT&T’s 4G network but, since it has support for 10 bands, it can fallback to the 3G networks as well! The only snag was that at the time of the launch, Amazon didn’t have U.S. Federal Communications Commission approval for the device! Although it could be seen as a foregone conclusion that the device would pass the FCC’s tests, it certainly wasn’t, especially when you consider that this is Amazon’s first device with any kind of cellular technology.

Galaxy Note 2

The FCC is under Samsung siege, with four new devices getting the regulatory approvals just a couple of days after we spotted the AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon versions of the Samsung Galaxy Note 2. Among the four new gadgets, there are, as expected, the other two Note 2 models officially announced as coming this fall, but also a pair of rather mysterious Android tablets.

Galaxy Note 2

Everybody’s waiting for the Samsung Galaxy Note 2 to hit the States, which is why we’re happy to let you know that the US release looks on schedule. No, we still haven’t heard anything official from Samsung or any one of the five carriers confirmed to sell the “beast”, but we have spotted three different versions of the device getting FCC approval.

Samsung Galaxy Camera

We’ve known about the Samsung Galaxy Camera for a while now. The idea of Android-based camera might not appeal to all types of users but it could be perfect for people who take a lot of pictures. The Galaxy Camera also offers a way to upload your photos and videos on the fly without having to hook an external camera to a laptop or other device to do it. In order to truly create an Android camera that can do everything from taking the picture to uploading, mobile broadband needs to be present.

AT&T 4G

AT&T might be a far second to Verizon in U.S. 4G LTE coverage, but that’s not stopping it from continuing its aggressive expansion plans. Part of the plan is to create a nationwide 4G band using 20MHz of spectrum in the 2.3GHz wireless communications services band for the LTE network.