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ICS on 16% of all Android devices, Jelly Bean at 0.8%

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by 1 year ago
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Last month, Google announced that ICS devices represented close to 11% of the total Android devices, and now a new report is saying that ICS saw a 50% increase on Android devices, jumping to 16% after a month. Gingerbread still owns the lion share of the market, sitting at 60%, and Froyo is now less than ICS, at 15.5%. Jelly Bean is now at 0.8%, thanks to the popular Nexus 7 and the upgrading of the Galaxy Nexus and Nexus S devices. The 50% jump for ICS sounds pretty impressive, but I wouldn’t get too excited about it just yet….

Nokia kills Meltemi, its last chance to compete with Android for the mass-market

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by 2 years ago
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Around the same time when Nokia announced their partnership with Microsoft to use WP7 as a replacement for their Symbian S60 OS for high-end devices, we got word of a Linux-based operating system called Meltemi, that was supposed to replace Symbian S40. Symbian S40 is on all of Nokia’s “feature phones” for the mass-market, with a price range between $50 and $200 (unlocked). The operating system is running on 2 billion smartphones today, and it still holds on to about 20% market share in Q1 2012, according to research firm IDC. But that market share is falling rapidly, even in countries…

MediaTek aims to put dual-core chips in sub-$200 Android 4.0 contract-free smartphones

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by 2 years ago
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MediaTek is the leader in the low-end of the chip market, bringing 550 million chipsets to the market last year alone (mostly in non-Android feature phones). MediaTek now aims to take over the low-end Android market, with powerful, yet inexpensive dual-core 1Ghz Cortex A9 chips (MT6577), for smartphones that cost under $200 (contract-free) and run Android 4.0 or later. The GPU in MediaTek’s new SoC will also be a pretty powerful one. They say it’s a PowerVR Series 5 GPU, so it’s probably the SGX540 (first shown in the Galaxy S). This graphics chip should be able to power 720p displays…

ARM and Allwinner work together to jumpstart the cheap Android tablet market

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by 2 years ago
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Allwinner is a chip maker not a tablet maker, but right now, the Chinese company’s products are a very popular choice for ~$100 Android devices, whether we’re talking about cheap Android tablets or those sub-$100 pocket PCs based on ARM chips. Allwinner chips usually have a 1-1.5 Ghz Cortex A8 CPU, coupled with a powerful Mali400 GPU (same as the one in the Galaxy S2), which enables even low-end tablets to smoothly run ICS and to play any type of HD content flawlessly. Analysts expect that 40 million tablets will be shipped in China alone this year, and it seems Allwinner’s…

ARM’s big.LITTLE processing technology is coming of age

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by 2 years ago
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ARM has been getting a lot of praises on their idea for the big.LITTLE technology, because it shows them not only a leader in mobile chip performance, but they are moving forward with higher and higher performance. Their chips still remain low-power overall and in the future they claim they will achieve this through big.LITTLE technology. Big.LITTLE means they are going to pair up a very low-power in-order CPU like Cortex A7, with their most powerful out-of-order CPU yet, the Cortex A15. This should work much in the same way that Nvidia’s 4+1 technology works, with their extra core companion….

ARM Cortex A9 vs ARM Cortex A15 – What to expect, and what’s the difference?

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by 2 years ago
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ARM has completely dominated the mobile market for more than a decade, with over 90% market share, but it wasn’t until the rise of modern smartphones that we started to witness chips more powerful than anyone could have ever imagined we’d see in phones — chips that are now even starting to threaten Intel’s dominance and their status quo computing architecture. Starting with the ARMv7 architecture and the first Cortex CPU based on it, the A8, we already began to think of these devices as superphones or mini-computers once the 1 GHz barrier was broken. Then came the dual core…