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Yesterday, AT&T agreed to acquire DirecTV in an equity deal valued at $48.5 billion. Including net debt, the transaction values the biggest satellite-TV provider in the U.S. at $67.1 billion. Let’s not forget that Comcast, the largest cable-TV company in the country, is waiting for regulatory approval for its $45 billion quest to join forces with Time Warner Cable.

AT&T

Reuters is reporting that AT&T is set to announce the acquisition of DirecTV tomorrow, according to a report by online news website Buzzfeed.com. Rumors have been circulating for some time now that AT&T has been in discussions to buy DirecTV for nearly $50 billion.

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AT&T has been struggling as of late in dealing with cities that are starting to fight back about the location of AT&T’s cell towers. Could it be due to AT&T wanting a city to shut down their downtown area for a tower removal, AT&T wanting to install a tower next to a middle school, AT&T wanting to install a tower above a children’s baseball field and sandbox or how about when AT&T approaches a city with an “inordinate number of requests for exemptions”?

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AndroidHeadines There has not been any tech service more over-hyped in the last year than AT&T’s GigaPower service. AT&T loves to issue press release after press release about how they are targeting 100 potential cities as locations for GigaPower. Those users could then get AT&T’s 1 gigabit service for $70-$100 per month. The Communications Workers of America called GigaPower “world changing.” Except, there appears to be several slight issues with the GigaPower service that has gotten attention but not quite the amount that it deserves. First, AT&T doesn’t actually deliver their 1 gigabit service to anyone. Nobody gets that right now. A very small…

DirecTV Blimp

Rumors of AT&T acquiring DirecTV have been around for decades now. But now the Wall Street Journal is reporting that AT&T could acquire DirecTV in as little as two weeks. According to the WSJ, insiders claim that the deal will be worth around $48 billion, and that AT&T will pay for the transaction primarily with stock.

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On Thursday, California and Minnesota took steps toward becoming the first states in the country to pass laws requiring smartphones to feature stronger anti-theft technology. The California Senate approved a measure that would require every smartphone sold in California to include a so-called kill switch that allows victims of theft to disable a stolen device. The bill fines retailers between $500 and $2,500 for selling smartphones without a kill switch. Apple and Microsoft dropped their opposition to the bill once tablets were excluded from the requirement and extending the deadline to July 2015.