Symantec Brings Norton Mobile Security To Android

August 15, 2011
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    Android malware is on the rise and it would be best to take a look at your security measures. Android tablets are similar enough to desktops and laptops that a normal antivirus designed for the Android platform should be enough. But how about phones? There are quite a few pieces of security software already available on the market for your phone, but having another one made available is great at expanding a person’s choice.

    Symantec has a previously had Norton Mobile Security as a beta – but it seems that the company is satisfied enough with it that they’re finally rolling out the final version. Coming in two setting, free and for-pay, Norton Mobile Security has a dedicated anti-malware module and an anti-theft module which lets you lock down your device whenever it gets lost or stolen. When you pay for it, you get an additional suite of protective apps.

    The anti-malware part of the program is pretty easy to understand. It’s essentially your bog-standard anti-virus program updated to the Android platform. You can schedule regular scans and target your SD card for scans and other parts of your phone. The anti-theft lock is easy to set-up also – just send an SMS message to your phone with the word “lock” and your password. It automatically locks down your phone until the password is entered again.
    Of course, the above is all you’re getting for free. So what do you get when you start paying for it?

    For a 30 dollar annual fee, you’ll have access to several additional features. Namely, anti-phishing software and the ability to remotely wipe and lock your data. You can also get message- and call-blocking. All you have to do to get these features is to upgrade the free version. However, is it worth it to upgrade?

    Personally, the free version is where you get the most bang for your buck. The additional features can be found in other much cheaper software options and Norton products can be a bit a resource hog. For free, it’s worth a try – but think long and hard before the upgrade.

    Source: Computer World

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