Study Finds No Link Between Cancer, Cell Phone Use

October 24, 2011
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You can finally use your cellphone 24 hours a day and 7 days a week without becoming paranoid that you will get cancer for frequently using it. A 15-year study by Danish researchers has found that using mobile phones does not expose someone to greater risks of developing brain cancer.

Numerous short-term studies previously claimed that prolonged use of cellphones could possibly lead a person to develop brain cancer. These said studies made the World Health Organization declare that cellphones are “possibly carcinogenic” while at the same time encourage further studies.

Researchers in Denmark took advantage of the use of the country’s National ID number system that is used for a variety of identification purposes, which includes the registration of cellphone subscribers to cellphone companies. The system allowed the researchers to subdivide the whole Danish population into subscribers and non-subscribers and then followed up  those who developed cancer and other diseases.

With the help of the country’s Institute for Cancer Epidemiology, the researchers were also able to track registered cancer patients in Denmark who were born after 1924. They were tracked using the same National ID number.

The researchers used the log-linear regression model to calculate the incidence rate ratio, which refers to the ratio between the rate at which the experimental population ended up with cancer and the rate at which the controlled population ended up with cancer.

In the end, most of the ratios are essentially 1, which means that the use of cellphones among the population had no link to the incidence of cancer. As observed in the 15-year study, the researchers found no indications that tumors are likely to occur in parts of the body where a phone was held against.

So far, the study is limited to 15 years, but the observation in the population will continue and really long-term adverse effects ( if there would be any) of using mobile phones are yet to be determined. For now, we will just have wait and enjoy our phones. Convinced?

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