Look out Gorilla Glass, next gen devices might feature sapphire displays

March 21, 2013
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    Sapphire-Crystal for Deboulle

    Have you ever dropped your smartphone or tablet? Not a pleasant experience, I know. As always, the relentless pursuit of innovation is yielding achievements and developments in areas not previously thought possible. Science once confined to the limits of military and security applications has been leaping over to the cutthroat mobile device market for some time now.

    When it comes to protecting the displays of our precious devices, Corning’s Gorilla Glass is currently state of the art. Here’s a demo we’ve seen at MWC in February.

    Sapphire could be the next wonder material 

    Sapphire itself is a special material. With a melting point of 2,030C, it remains virtually impervious to pretty much everything that’s thrown at it. As the second hardest material next to diamond, it is significantly more abundant and less expensive, making it perfect for our beloved mobile devices. What’s more is that it has long enjoyed success in a variety of applications – namely bulletproofing the cars of some very special people, and on Rolex watches to ensure that the face stays scratch free throughout years of use. And there’s many more.

    Pieces of GT Advanced Technologies sapphire glass. The one on the left is designed for an iPhone 5

    Extremetech GT Advanced Technologies sapphire glass prototypes. Can you spot the one for the iPhone 5 on the far left?

    The sum of it is that sapphire is ten times more scratch resistant than normal glass, and, while we don’t have real world tests of how it will stack up next to Corning’s famous Gorilla Glass, we’d have to say that it’s likely to yield some drastic improvements for people that tend to drop their devices more than they ought to.

    Naturally, it’s still a material that has a crystalline structure, and is therefore still capable of shattering or cracking, but the fact remains, it is significantly harder and stronger than the materials used in our smartphone displays today. While it remains roughly ten times as expensive as its immediate competitor – Gorilla Glass, economies of scale in the furiously competitive mobile device economy will result in it becoming much cheaper in a relatively short period of time. According to the talented nerds at ExtremeTech:

     ”Sapphire glass is around three times the strength and scratch resistance of Corning’s Gorilla Glass, [making] an almost perfect smartphone screen. There’s one caveat: according to a market analyst, a sheet of Gorilla Glass costs around $3, while the same piece of sapphire glass would cost $30. Thanks to increasing competition, though, the cost of sapphire glass is dropping. It wouldn’t be surprising to see a high-end smartphone (such as the iPhone) use a sapphire screen in the next few years.”

    If you’ve taken the time to see our drop tests, you’ll know that most devices don’t hold up very well against concrete. Assuming similar advancements are made in other materials, we one day could all own devices that are incredibly hard to smash, shatter, and break.

    Is this a welcome advancement? Have you ever shattered or broken your devices display?

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    Comments

    • Magnetic1

      Are you talking about rubicon? The military uses saphire substrate for microwave circuits, because of special high temperature tolerance, I think. Maybe they could have saved a few bucks by going with a heat sink but I digress.

    • MasterMuffin

      “we don’t know have real world tests” :D

      • http://www.AndroidAuthority.com/ Darcy Alexander LaCouvee

        Thanks for the find MasterMuffin. Not much slips by you, boss!

        • MasterMuffin

          :D actually not to brag and I don’t want to sound like a douche or anything, I often find amy typos, but I just don’t say them because I don’t want to be grammar nazi/I know how you guys write a lot of this stuff so it would be a miracle to nt have typos :)

    • DannyL

      Sapphire is already used in the iPhone 5′s camera. I hope it is not used in screens as everything will have a purple flare.

      • http://trapchan.blogspot.com trapchan

        purple flare?? You mean chromatic abberation?

    • Marcellus1

      This sounds good, but aren’t we on the cusp on moving to flexible displays anyway? This technology may be arriving a bit too late to become relevant…

    • asyouaskforit

      I did a survey, more than 60% of my collegues will pay $20+ more for a sappire scratch proof screen. Its a given, people wants it. No more headaches from scratches and more protection from cracks.

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