Samsung is killing it in the NAND flash market

by: John DyeMarch 7, 2016
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When it comes to semiconductor memories, the NAND flash memory chip is second only to DRAM, and it’s only becoming more and more popular on the global market. Although the technology was originally introduced by Toshiba at the end of the eighties, the company that’s really dropping jaws in NAND sales is Samsung.

The figures are in for Samsung’s 2015 Q4 performance, and it looks like the South Korean company snagged a massive 33. 6 percent of NAND flash sales the world over. This made them the largest purveyor of this form of memory in the world. For perspective on how much they’re crushing this market, consider Toshiba, which came in second place for the October-December period. Toshiba only sold 18.6 percent of the market, meaning Samsung nearly doubled their sales. What’s important to note too is that just the previous quarter, Toshiba swung 20.5 percent of the market while Samsung only accounted for 31.5, meaning the gap between the two companies is widening at a rapid pace.

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The NAND flash market actually saw a slight decline during the quarter across the board due to the saturation of the mobile market and decreased smartphone part consumption. However, Samsung managed to stay profitable in the area, being one of the few companies to report revenue growth over the time period.

Samsung is using their own NAND flash embedded Multi-Media Card in the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge, and if sales on these two devices continue to go strong, then the smartphone maker can only be expected to continue acceleration in the market. What do you think of Samsung’s recent success in this area? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

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  • RunningGreat

    Keep up the good work Sammy!

    • Shamoy Rahman

      Nah, I’ll keep buying Toshiba flash.

      • zeth006

        Toshiba’s not even a consumer flash memory seller, so what exactly are you trying to say?

  • Brad Fortin

    Now we know who the biggest seller is, but who’s the biggest buyer?

  • Happy

    It’s good to see that non-American companies are leading the market “cause if they were American then the bully Uncle Sam might decide to randomly ban sales to whoever they fancy (e.g. ZTE for the semiconductors).

  • Karly Johnston

    If they want to come into this country, charge them a 35% tax.

    • wcjeep

      Trade war? Toshiba and Samsung account for about 51% of the market per this article. Both are foreign countries. 35% tax on half the market at a minimum would probably cause many unforseen circumstances. None of them good.

      • Karly Johnston

        If you look at the trade deficits with Japan and SK… something must be done.

        • wcjeep

          I agree something must be done. Initiating a trade war is not the answer. I would start with Federal and State law reviews. California bans certain kinds of fishing. However, they will import the fish from countries that openly catch the fish the same way. Let’s revisit many laws that ban locally unpopular industry. If it’s not illegal and has good paying jobs we should revisit the law or regulation.

          • Karly Johnston

            Trade war is the quickest way since we are the only ones who are last man standing. If they won’t let our companies compete with theirs we have to send a message.

    • zeth006

      Then don’t be surprised if American goods sold abroad get the same treatment. Think IP violations in China are bad? Wait til you see Korea and Japan banning American medical devices and simply creating ripoffs.

      • Karly Johnston

        American goods already receive the same treatment and we let them dump their crap for nothing. The American consumer has more purchasing power than all of Asian households combined.

        • zeth006

          Nope, Japanese and Korean companies for the most part abide by US tech patents. And as China and other poor countries (e.g. Indonesia, Vietnam, etc) exit their developed nation status, they’ll have an interest in enforcing their own IP and protecting America’s. Japan and Korea were not too long ago in similar positions. Any goods they DO want to produce that are American have to be produced under license. That still constitutes a pretty significant source of revenue for various defense and consumer goods companies.

          I’m sure we’d all love to live in a fantasy where we make and sell everything in America. But that’s just not gonna happen. And as the Chinese consumer market grows, I don’t think there are going to be nearly as many in America who share your sentiment. Thankfully, we have more level-headed people in positions of power.

          • Karly Johnston

            As these emerging markets have grown, our trade deficits get bigger so your theory that they grow and buy more from us is false. We have let them grow at the expense of our industry and have not benefited enough to let this continue. We need balanced trade so we can balance the capital account. Otherwise the next step is national bankruptcy.

          • Shamoy Rahman

            Now ask yourself, if the US trade debt is $13 Trillion, and the richest 2% of people in america have over $250 Trillion, why isn’t that money being spent to cover things up?

          • Shamoy Rahman

            As Chinese wages rise, manufacturing will shift to Vietnam, Thailand, and Cambodia.

    • Shamoy Rahman

      Japan and Japanese electronics companies are fine for now because they’re not really profiting big or dominating anything. On the other hand, Samsung needs some big tariffs and taxes for more ethical competition. Instead of Samsung eating up 35% market share for NAND and cannibalizing a huge share of US smartphone sales, if all companies had around 15-20% market share each, things would be much better and more fair for everyone.

    • Shamoy Rahman

      Sony deserves a lot more sales for its smartphones. Samsung eating up all US sales by taking advantage of low costs is not fair at all and its not competitive.

  • Steven Fox

    I would still go with Toshiba though, Samsung rely too much on their brand name for lots of products.

    • zeth006

      When’s the last time Toshiba sold flash memory on Amazon?

  • Shamoy Rahman

    Toshiba Sandisk just overtook Samsung’s NAND flash market share. Toshiba-Sandisk 34% while Samsung has 33%.

    • zeth006

      Toshiba doesn’t own Sandisk. Both only share NAND supply and use different firmware and controllers not to mention other parts that go into flash memory.

      • Shamoy Rahman

        They are in a joint venture. All of their V-NAND will be the same.

        • zeth006

          And a joint venture’s existence doesn’t mean the parties’ parent companies and products are the same. That’s like pooling Qualcomm’s and Samsung’s CPU market share numbers together just because Samsung’s fabbing for them for the 830. There would be competitive advantage for Toshiba to hand out its manufacturing prowess for free. Try reading up on what exactly goes into flash memory. Let’s just say it’s more than just 1 lego block.