Rumor: Asus and Acer are launching new Chromebooks in the second half of 2013

April 29, 2013
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According to the rumors, 2013 is the year Google focuses on the desktop. Although Chrome OS has been chugging along mildly, it has yet to set the world on fire. Some have claimed that it is just a little ahead of its times, while others say that it needs to merge with Android to gain mainstream notice (Google says this won’t be happening, at least not soon anyways).

According to upstream sources, Digitimes is reporting that Acer and Asustek definitely believe Chrome OS has a future and as such have planned Chromebooks for release in the second half of 2013. The publication also says that Google will be ramping up its advertising for Chrome OS at the same time.

Acer has already made a Chromebook, one that proved so popular that at one time it accounted for 5-10% of Acer’s American computer shipments. However, it appears that interest died down soon after, prompting Acer to reconsider its support of Chrome OS:

Acer used to ship 150,000-200,000 units of its existing US$199 11.6-inch Chromebook - which features a 1.1GHz Intel Celeron processor, a 320GB hard disc drive (HDD) and 100GB Google Drive cloud storage - monthly, but the volume dropped to only 20,000-30,000 units in January 2013, which prompted the vendor to halt related shipment plans for the second half of 2013
Digitimes

Now however, Acer has changed its tune and is rumoured to be planning to release a new 11.6-inch Chromebook in July, specifically targeting students. Asustek, which hasn’t entered the Chrome OS market as of yet, is also gearing up to release its own Chromebook in the second half of the year, according to the same sources.

Prior Chromebook vendors Samsung, HP and Lenovo would also be releasing Chromebooks in the future:

Google is also cooperating with players including Samsung, Asustek, HP and Acer for Androidbooks. The sources believe that through the cooperation over both Chromebooks and Androidbooks, it will heap strong pressure on Microsoft, forcing the software giant to take a more cautious approach when making strategies for licensing fees or entering the hardware business.
Digitimes

Another detail worth noting is the mention of Androidbooks. The blogosphere has been set alight this week, after Intel confirmed that it is working on Intel-powered Android laptops, so this just adds another question into the debate.

Should you get a Chrome OS based device? Or are Android-based devices the better option? Let us know in the comments.

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