Review: iFixit does Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 dissection

August 23, 2012
6 33 0 0

    Samsung’s newest tablet has been dissected by the iFixit team and they have discovered some good news for those who like to tackle repairs themselves: the front glass and LCD can be separated and replaced individually. For those unfamiliar with the new bigger brother of the original Galaxy Note, the 10.1 variant comes with a Exynos 4 Quad 1.4 GHz processor (with integrated 3D graphics), a nice 1280 x 800 pixels, 149 ppi, 10.1 inch multitouch display, 2GB of RAM and a choice of 16GB or 32GB of internal flash storage. Externally the device is the same thickness as an iPad 2 but with a larger screen (the iPad has a 9.7″ screen). There is also a 5 MP rear camera and 1.9 MP front camera.

    For those who think (or worry) about any possible repairs that your tablet might need (say if you drop it or accidentally flush it down the toilet) then there is some good news. First the 5 MP rear camera and the 2 MP front camera are independent components (they don’t share a single cable) meaning they can be replaced separately. Also, since the  glass can be replaced separate from the LCD, replacing a shattered screen should be much cheaper. The result is that iFixit have given the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 a “repairability score” of 8 out of 10 (where 10 is easiest to repair).

    iFixit

    When looking at the battery, the team found that it is easy to remove, even easier than the one found in the Nexus 7. The 136 gram cell (which accounts for 23 percent of the total 594 grams)  is rated at 3.7 volts, 7000 mAh, and 25.90 watt-hours. This gives it an estimated battery life of 8 hours, which sadly is less than the new iPad’s 42.5 watt-hour battery and corresponding 10 hour battery life.

    If you like to see what the innards of a top-of-the-line tablet looks like, then I highly recommend taking a look at all the fantastic photos that the iFixit team have provided!

    Note: The iFixit team make taking the 10.1″ tablet apart look like child’s play but, as they mention on the site, the teardowns provide a look inside the device and should not be used as disassembly instructions!

     

    6 33 0

    Comments

    Popular

    Latest