Motorola CEO promises even cheaper devices and more customization for premium offerings

January 22, 2014
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Motorola Moto G aa 10

When the Moto G was first announced late last year, many publications and individual consumers were left both astonished and extremely excited by the device. A highly capable Android handset for a starting price of $179 had the power to transform the mobile industry in a major way, and the early effects of this change can already be seen through other reasonably decent spec’d and priced devices like the Asus ZenFone series.

As it turns out, this may just be the beginning. Speaking with Trusted Reviews, Motorola’s CEO Dennis Woodside hints that the company could be working to drive pricing even lower with future devices. In the informal interview, Woodside commented that “in much of the world $179 is a lot of money so there’s a big market at a price point of less than $179.”

Speaking further, Woodside said they were looking at ways to deliver such a lower-priced offering. “We’re going to look at that and just delivering on that value promise is super important. I mean why can’t these devices be $50? There’s no reason that can’t happen so we’re going to push that.”

I mean why can’t these devices be $50? There’s no reason that can’t happen.

Now it’s important to realize that Woodside isn’t necessarily confirming that they will be able to produce a $50 handset, only that they are looking to drive down prices further than what we’ve already seen with the Moto G.

It’s also unclear exactly when we’ll see this even cheaper Motorola budget handset. Still, if Motorola could pull off releasing a handset with a $50-$100 price tag that’s still able to provide a reasonably solid Android experience, the impact could be huge to say the least.

Aside from hinting about its budget handset plans, Woodside also talked a bit about their plans for their more premium ‘flagship’ devices. Not only did the CEO mention that they will continue to focus on customization over simply pushing bleeding-edge hardware, he also alluded to new customization options that could extend into screen size and more.

On the more premium side we’re pushing more customisation. Today you have colours and beginning of materials but you don’t have screen size and you don’t have functionality and we’re going to bring all that in in the next year or so.
Dennis Woodside
Motorola CEO

The big takeaway is that the Google-led Motorola is really just getting started. The Moto X and Moto G were the perfect way to introduce us to the new Motorola, but now the company needs to further kick things up a gear to show us exactly what they are made of.

What do you think of Motorola’s recent direction? Impressed by the Moto X and Moto G? Or are you disappointed that the company has put cutting-edge specs on the back burner?

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