Motorola announces new “exchange program”

September 7, 2012
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    We’re not sure what the deal is with Moto, but they have a reputation for not updating their phones to the latest Android. This is not only frustrating for consumers who may want to see what new features/capabilities their phone has, but also for the company’s public trust. Maybe they haven’t figured out restricting their devices restricts their revenue growth?

    Then again, maybe they have, which is why they recently went live with a $100 credit program towards a new Motorola device. The first catch is you have to be the owner of a Motorola phone already. The other catch is you’d really have to be a fanboy to buy another Moto device knowing they don’t update their devices. I mean, seriously Motorola, why not just correct the problem instead of bribing people which adds to your bottom line?

    When you’re ready, and if you have an older non-updated Moto device, go here and inform the and they’ll give you the credit for a new device. Then you can be happy with 2 devices that may still run Gingerbread, while everyone else is showing off Jelly Bean. At least they’ve started unlocking bootloaders, so we can only assume they are on the right path.

    Do you have a Moto device and are you interested in this credit?

    Comments

    • Demiurgo

      Do you have any idea what are you talking about. The 100 dollar is for those with old mobile incapable to upgrade to jelly Bean. Which they have promissed to will be possible to upgrade to all new mobiles and most of the new ones. And the discount is for those mobiles without the capabilities to run the new OS properly.

      • http://twitter.com/jmwilliams Jason Williams

        He obviously can’t be bothered by any facts..

    • Dave in the USA

      I had a motorola phone that came with bluetooth, and while the bluetooth on my laptop could find the phone and had limited connectivity with it, the only meaningful thing I could do was to upload ringtone that I had purchased from the carrier. To actually see any of the files (video, image or audio) and download images or video taken with the camera phone or upload MP3s (because it was also an MP3 player), I had to purchase Motorola’s proprietary software ($80 to download it from the big M) and after I purchased it and installed it, it didn’t work (well, it found the phone, and showed me the names of the files, but any attempt to download or upload from/to the phone got an error which M said would be fixed later with a firmware upgrade…someday). So I had to purchase a $50 proprietary data cable and another $45 for a different download app which did work, but poorly. So, sorry Motorola, you will not be getting any more of my money for any device.

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