Meet UDOO: the Android/Linux Arduino mini PC

April 15, 2013
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    udoo-android-linux-arduino-1

    Whilst Android has become a standard platform on most mobile devices, it has still yet to really integrate itself within the computing world. However, this could be all set to change thanks to a new computer system which looks to help bring the operating system to a whole new audience and platform.

    The UDOO is an Arduino-based computer system that has been formatted to run on several platforms such as Android and Linux. With the device running a Freescale.i.MX6 ARM Cortex A9 processor, it means that developers can run the Ice Cream 4.0 version of Android much like it would on a smartphone or tablet.

    On top of that, UDOO has 1GB of RAM and has Wi-Fi built in so it can connect to other Android devices at a drop of a hat. There are also 2 USB ports and 2 MicroUSB slots to further open up the computer to files and other systems depending on what the developer want to do with the platform.

    Versatility is the key to its potential

    As the UDOO contains Arduino’s SAM3X8E ARM Cortex M3 processor, the system can be tweaked for a whole variety of purposes depending on what users feel like using on the system. In the display video, the UDOO’s creator have so far used the system to run video games, act as a motion sensor for music control and to control a robot that can connect with cameras and tablets.

    When it launches, interested buyers will be able to get their hands on the computer for as little as $109 although anyone wanting a quad-core processor on the UDOO will need to pay an additional $20 for the device. Of course, its creators have also turned to Kickstarter to help get UDOO over the finish line where backers are receiving $10 off the finished product when it’s released in September.

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    Comments

    • scissors95

      If only I had that kind of money

    • http://twitter.com/lukamlinar Luka Mlinar

      I want it but i wouldn’t pay 109$. That’s crazy.

      • http://www.facebook.com/Trent8381 Trent Richards

        I can’t figure out if this is sarcasm. I was amazed that it was such a low price.

        • Bradley Bertrim

          I’m pretty sure he’s serious, albeit being a little over dramatic. With its competition really being the raspberry pi which runs from 25 – 30 dollars it is hitting the high price range for a prototyping board. It’s very neat and powerful in comparison but if its for prototyping or using in some sort of embedded solution you don’t need a lot of processing power. And if you do need power, for instance to use it as an actual linux PC or media centre, then there are better options for that price point. And even then the Raspberry Pi works okay for both of those scenarios.

          If it was maybe 50-75 dollars I’d probably go for it. But its current price tag of 100 dollars really makes me weigh cost/benefit.

          • http://www.facebook.com/Trent8381 Trent Richards

            I wasn’t familiar with the other options. Thanks for the info!

        • http://twitter.com/lukamlinar Luka Mlinar

          No sarcasm m8. For someone making a prototype this is not a big deal but as a hobby board the price is well over what i would pay. Maybe others feel different. :/

        • http://twitter.com/lukamlinar Luka Mlinar

          No sarcasm m8. For someone making a prototype this is not a big deal but as a hobby board the price is well over what i would pay. Maybe others feel different. :/

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