February 25, 2016
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galaxy s7 vs lg g5 quick look aa-2

Yesterday we learned that both the LG G5 and Samsung Galaxy S7 (and S7 Edge) have decided to forgo Android 6.0 Marshmallow’s adoptable storage feature. That’s LG and Samsung’s decision to make, but we can’t help but wonder why they didn’t give us more internal storage variants then. The LG G5 will only have 32GB internal storage and while Samsung is offering a 64GB model, it isn’t coming to the United States or Europe. In 2016, is 32GB storage enough room for all your apps? Depends on who you ask.

with some games like Final Fantasy IX taking as much as 4GB of space – it’s easy to see how gamers and power users might run into issues when it comes to internal storage

On one hand, the microSD slot will still store all your music, movies, and photos (generally by default), and there’s even a few apps that can be transferred manually to microSD on many phones out there (apps like Facebook, etc). Still, with some games like Final Fantasy IX taking as much as 4GB of space – it’s easy to see how gamers and power users might run into issues when it comes to internal storage on the G5 and Galaxy S7.

With adoptable storage, this wouldn’t be an issue. As most of you probably know, adoptable storage allows you to basically merge your microSD and internal storage into one partition, with the OS automatically placing things wherever there’s room – including all your apps.

galaxy s7 vs lg g5 quick look aa-12

Of course, adoptable storage has its own potential downfalls. First, Samsung and LG argue that it’s confusing, mainly because a memory card used as adoptable storage is then locked to at phone, making the card unreadable elsewhere and making it useless for quick data transfers directly from the card. Another possibly pitfall is the huge disparity in performance with a ‘cheap’ memory card versus a higher-end card, a distinction many casual folks won’t probably be able to make. If someone turns on adoptable storage with a cheapo card, the end result will be a much more sluggish experience.

We can understand why Samsung and LG might want to prevent these things from negatively affecting people’s opinions of their phones. When it comes down to it though, many of those who are upset about this decision suggest LG and Samsung could have made this a hidden option (under developer’s options, etc), thus ensuring that only those who know what they are doing ever attempt to turn it on. Instead, the only way we’ll ever get this choice is through custom ROMs.

So that leads us to the crux of the matter: do you feel 32GB storage is enough? Would you have liked more storage options, or is having microSD – even without adoptable storage support – more than good enough?

Andrew Grush
Andrew is dedicated to reporting on the latest developments in the world of Android, and is very passionate about mobile technology and technological innovation in general. While he appreciates Android in all of its forms, he prefers a clean stock experience when possible and currently rocks a Nexus 5. Andrew also loves to engage with his readers, and welcomes well-thought-out conversations and responses in the comments section!
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