LG well on its way to being a chipmaker, designs first A15 quad-core chip

May 3, 2013
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Move over Samsung and Apple, LG’s on a roll.

First there was the LG Nexus 4, which has done so well that rumors indicate Google is working with the company once again for the Nexus 5. LG has also been pushing hard when it comes to flexible display technology. Hell, earlier today rumors even surfaced claiming that LG is working on an ‘unbreakable’ OLED display.

So what’s next for the company? According to Korean-based ET News, LG has now completed the internal design phase for its first quad-core ARM Cortex A15 processor.

Later this month, TSMC will start chip production using a 28 nanometer High-K Metal Gate process. Once the first chips roll off the production line, it will be time to test these bad boys out and decide if they are ready for commercial launch.

For LG, this is the company’s second house-designed chip, with the first being the H13, which was unveiled at CES 2013 for LG’s Cinema 3D televisions.

What LG’s quad-core A15 processor means for the future

The LG quad-core A15 processor isn’t exactly exciting when compared to chips like the Exynos 5 Octa, so why should we even care? Samsung has found a lot of success in creating its own processors, but it didn’t happen overnight. The A15 represents a crucial step forward for LG, one that could see LG continue to rise up as a significant player in the mobile market.

In Q1 of 2013, LG managed to place third in the smartphone market, shipping 10.3 million handsets. This was an impressive 110.2% growth compared to the same timeframe last year.

Another Nexus, its own chips, flexible displays, ‘unbreakable’ displays – all these puzzle pieces fit together to show a company that isn’t sitting still when it comes to technology, marketing and innovation.

Should Apple, Samsung and the rest of the mobile world be at all worried? Maybe not, but they certainly shouldn’t count LG out as a threat. Personally I’ve had mixed success with LG over the years and am not particularly excited about the Optimus G Pro, but I have to give kudos to LG for branching out to new avenues and taking a bold step forward.

What do you think of LG getting involved in the chip-making game? How do you feel about the company’s overall direction as of late?

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