As Intel Inside campaign targets mobile world, competitors prepare to fight back

September 24, 2012
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Intel Inside

Does the brand of the chip in your mobile device matter to you? While many Android Authority readers might have a chipmaker brand preference, the truth is that most consumers could care less. The brand of the device more than likely matters more to the average tablet or smartphone owner.

These same consumers have a remarkably different attitude when it comes to desktop and laptop computers. Having an “Intel Processor” matters to most PC buyers. Why is this? The key reason is that Intel invested heavily in marketing to make it this way. AMD is a great brand but the Intel Inside campaign has made Intel better known among the average consumer.

How many mobile consumers know what Qualcomm, Texas Instruments and Nvidia are? The mobile market doesn’t seem all that interested in processor brands, but his could be quickly changing. Intel is showing up in more Android and Windows mobile devices, Intel Inside stickers in tow. Even Google’s Motorola Mobility is introducing the RAZR i as their first Intel branded smartphone. As more phones and tablets show up with Intel logos on them, other processor companies are likely going to start fighting back.

In October, Qualcomm will begin its own branding campaign and the Snapdragon logo will likely start appearing in more and more commercials.

What about other major chip makers? Even Nvidia seems to be reaching out and developing brand recognition. More and more consumers know what a Tegra 3 processor is. This is especially true when it comes to gamers who rely on Nvidia graphics chips for many of their favorite PC games.

One thing seems clear according to Reuters: a processor branding war seems to be brewing. Processor companies can no longer afford to hang around in the background, they need to be publicly recognized.  Can Intel’s stronger branding make any difference as it sets its sight on the mobile world, or are Qualcomm and Nvidia likely to continue to dominate? What could this war mean for other mobile processor companies like Texas Instruments?

 

 

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