Google wants iPhone, iPad import ban in new ITC patent-based case

August 18, 2012
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Motorola, which is now owned by Google, filed a new patent-based claim with the U.S. International Trade Commission against Apple, seeking an import ban in the U.S. against several Apple products including the iPhone, iPad, iPod touch and Mac.

Google, via Motorola, is attacking Apple with seven patents, and neither one is a FRAND, or a standards essential patent. According to Bloomberg, some of Motorola’s allegedly infringed patents cover technologies related to location reminders, e-mail notification and phone/video players. In addition to other features on Apple devices that are apparently in violation of these patents, the voice-based Siri assistant is also named, which is definitely an interesting detail for the case.

Motorola is arguing that Apple is avoiding licensing talks and that’s why it resorted to bringing another case against the iPhone maker at the ITC:

“We would like to settle these patent matters, but Apple’s unwillingness to work out a license leaves us little choice but to defend ourselves and our engineers’ innovations,” Motorola Mobility said in an e-mailed statement.

This is Motorola’s second ITC complaint against Apple, with the first one, largely based on FRAND patents, scheduled for a final ruling for August 24. In that case, an ITC judge said in April that Apple infringed one of the four Motorola patents in play, although that’s a Wi-Fi-related FRAND patent and it will be interesting to see whether the Commission will issue an unfavorable verdict against Apple – a product ban – based on standards essential patents.

Currently, Apple is engaged alongside Samsung in one of the most interesting patent-based battles to date in the mobile business, but the company is also fighting against Motorola (Google) and HTC in other courts, so the patent wars among giants are yet to come to an end.

We’ll also remind you that a patent-based case between Apple and Motorola has been recently dismissed with prejudice in Chicago, and that the two companies are fighting similar battles in other regions of the world.

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