Google’s Nexus 7 details leaked ahead of Google I/O

June 25, 2012
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By now, everyone knows about the upcoming inexpensive Google Nexus 7 tablet. The slate is made by Asus, but it’s a full-fledged Nexus device, which means that it will run the latest version of Android (Jellybean/4.1) and will receive updates straight from Google.

Well, you won’t have to wait much longer, since we’re just two days away from Google I/O, when the tablet will be unveiled together with Android 4.1 Jellybean. You should be able to get your hands on the Nexus 7 tablet from the same day (if you’re going to Google I/O) or a couple of weeks later, in July, when the tablet is set to start selling.

We now know a lot more details about this much expected Google tablet, thanks to a training document leaked to Gizmodo Australia, which mentions the following specs:

  • Android 4.1 Jelly Bean
  • 1.3Ghz quad-core NVIDIA Tegra 3 processor
  • 1GB RAM
  • 8GB / 16GB onboard storage options
  • NFC with Google Wallet and Android Beam
  • IPS Display
  • 1280 by 800 pixel resolution
  • 1.2 MP front facing camera
  • 9 hour battery life
  • $199/$249 for the 8GB/16GB versions respectively

If all these specs are true, the Nexus 7 will be a strong competitor to the Kindle Fire, and, choosing the Nexus over the Fire would be a no-brainer, in my opinion.

The main advantages, hardware-wise, would be the quad-core Tegra 3 processor (which gives you access to Tegra Zone games), the 1280×800 resolution, which will allow you to play videos at their native HD resolution, and the crisper screen, at 216ppi versus the 170ppi of the Kindle Fire (making it a better e-reader then the Kindle Fire). Other perks are the NFC chip, the front camera, 1 GB of RAM, and, it seems, even better battery life (9 hours vs 8 hours). So, as far as hardware goes, it seems that the Nexus 7 will be better than the Kindle Fire in almost every way.

Software-wise, as advantages, you’ll get a constantly-updated, pure Android experience, which is going to be a big deal, considering that Amazon is less focused on making a great OS, and more on getting people to buy their content and products. Plus, you get a store that has 10 to 20 times the amount of apps that Amazon’s Appstore has, which means you won’t miss out on all the great new apps that come out on Android. You also get Gmail and all the other great Google services that Amazon is blocking on the Kindle Fire.

Many of you Android fans might be interested in a Kindle Fire, only to root it and put a stock version of Android anyway. So why not buy the original instead, the way Google meant it to be? Even if Amazon drops the price of the Kindle Fire to $150, the Google tablet should still offer much better value for the money.

What do you think?

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