Google Glass video shows how the device can be used in everyday life [video]

June 11, 2013
78 43 22

Google Glass video

A new Google Glass video shows you how the device can be successfully used in everyday life, giving you answers in situations you come across in various moments.

The video shows Googlers testing the device with various searches, some of them very funny, and putting Google’s search capabilities, and the way they can connect various pieces of information, to work. Verizon has also promoted Google’s voice search capabilities in a new ad (but it’s not Google Glass-related).

Coming back to the new Google Glass video, it must be said that its subjects are asking Glass questions from a lot of areas of activity, and the device seems to have no problem quickly answering them. Moreover, you can use it to instantly get a translation of a few words or a conversion (useful when in a foreign country), check out restaurants around your location, as well as perform mathematical operations and look for flight details.

google glass video

But if those are examples of useful information, the truth is that we usually look for stranger things on Google in our everyday lives. That’s why the video also shows how Google Glass can be used to provide answers to various questions (some of them very funny), or show you pictures you want to see – like some images of Richard Branson in drag (ok, maybe you don’t want to see those). You can also ask it questions that bug you at a certain moment, like “what was the movie in which Jim Carrey gets his memory erased?” or find out what the band that played the “How Bizarre” song was.

The device shows some very good comprehension of spoken language, even when asked to search for something like “Bob Loblaw Law Blog”. All in all, the video shows that you can rely on Google Glass for help in your day-to-day activities:

Are you looking forward to Google Glass? Do you plan on buying the device when it becomes available?

Comments

  • Austin Eschweiler

    Alright…the translate feature is pretty legit, and I could see the conversion stuff coming in handy.

  • Austin Eschweiler

    Alright…the translate feature is pretty legit, and I could see the conversion stuff coming in handy.

  • Matti M

    WOAH Dat’s nice. It does it’s job nicely.

  • Matti M

    WOAH Dat’s nice. It does it’s job nicely.

  • zzzz

    the google girl is cute

  • zzzz

    the google girl is cute

    • OMGgary

      Amanda Rosenberg is super cute.

  • Joaquim Amado Lopes

    I’ve worn glasses for over 30 years and I wish I could go without them.
    Google Glass looks awkward to have on your face, the weight is all on one side (which is a problem is terms of ergonomics), creates a blind spot, is distracting even when turned off, most of its uses are better served with a smartphone or a smartwatch (both much more comfortable to wear) and I imagine its continuous use would cause eye problems.
    And it looks like any sudden head movement will make it fly away from your head.

    Google Glass is an interesting concept but only for very specific situations, when there is a benefit in superimposing information with reality (GPS orientation, equipment repair, surgeons, the military, …), not to have on all the time and certainly not to perform web searches on the go.

    • izzyt

      ACTUALLY I HAVE READ BLOGS ON PEOPLE WHO ARE GLASS USERS AND THEY SAY THAT GLASS IS ACTUALLY “LIGHTER THAT A PAIR OF SPECTACLES’ -TECHRADAR

      • Joaquim Amado Lopes

        According to http://www.t3.com/reviews/google-glass-review, Google Glass weighs 42g. Compare that to your smartphone (the iPhone weighs 112g).
        Anyway, you only addressed one of the seven things I mentioned.

    • Google Glass Owner

      This is the review of a guy who was not able to try the glass even once.

    • http://petercast.net Peterson Silva

      1 – “I wish I could go without them.” – subjective. Next.
      2 – “looks awkward” – subjective. Next.
      3 – “The weight is all on one side” – haven’t heard a reviewer say a thing about it. Can anyone with a unit care to chime in?
      4 – “Distracting even when turned off” – like the other comment in this thread has more simply put… How do you know that?
      5 – “most of its uses are better served with a smartphone or a smartwatch” – I don’t actually fancy taking the phone out of the pocket all the time. I don’t like it at all, really.
      6 – “(both much more comfortable to wear)” – you don’t even “wear” a smartphone and, well, about the smartwatch, you haven’t worn Glass in order to make such an absolute comparison. Bloody hell, so many assumptions.
      7 – “And it looks like any sudden head movement will make it fly away from your head.” – Now the assumption is of a different nature; that Glass engineers and designers haven’t actually thought. This is a big thing to miss, man. I wouldn’t bet on that. Plus, how many “sudden head movements” do you make everyday? Do you have your face punched a lot?

      To sum it up, I think you’re being too quick to judge. I’m not your nemesis, I don’t actively defend or promote Glass, but I think it’s too early to form such a strong opinion at this time.

  • Joaquim Amado Lopes

    I’ve worn glasses for over 30 years and I wish I could go without them.
    Google Glass looks awkward to have on your face, the weight is all on one side (which is a problem is terms of ergonomics), creates a blind spot, is distracting even when turned off, most of its uses are better served with a smartphone or a smartwatch (both much more comfortable to wear) and I imagine its continuous use would cause eye problems.
    And it looks like any sudden head movement will make it fly away from your head.

    Google Glass is an interesting concept but only for very specific situations, when there is a benefit in superimposing information with reality (GPS orientation, equipment repair, surgeons, the military, …), not to have on all the time and certainly not to perform web searches on the go.

    • izzyt

      ACTUALLY I HAVE READ BLOGS ON PEOPLE WHO ARE GLASS USERS AND THEY SAY THAT GLASS IS ACTUALLY “LIGHTER THAT A PAIR OF SPECTACLES’ -TECHRADAR

      • Joaquim Amado Lopes

        According to http://www.t3.com/reviews/google-glass-review, Google Glass weighs 42g. Compare that to your smartphone (the iPhone weighs 112g).
        Anyway, you only addressed one of the seven things I mentioned.

    • Google Glass Owner

      This is the review of a guy who was not able to try the glass even once.

      • Joaquim Amado Lopes

        You’re right. Am I the only guy who has voiced scepticism or enthusiasm over the Glass without trying it even once?

    • http://petercast.net Peterson Silva

      1 – “I wish I could go without them.” – subjective. Next.
      2 – “looks awkward” – subjective. Next.
      3 – “The weight is all on one side” – haven’t heard a reviewer say a thing about it. Can anyone with a unit care to chime in?
      4 – “Distracting even when turned off” – like the other comment in this thread has more simply put… How do you know that?
      5 – “most of its uses are better served with a smartphone or a smartwatch” – I don’t actually fancy taking the phone out of the pocket all the time. I don’t like it at all, really.
      6 – “(both much more comfortable to wear)” – you don’t even “wear” a smartphone and, well, about the smartwatch, you haven’t worn Glass in order to make such an absolute comparison. Bloody hell, so many assumptions.
      7 – “And it looks like any sudden head movement will make it fly away from your head.” – Now the assumption is of a different nature; that Glass engineers and designers haven’t actually thought. This is a big thing to miss, man. I wouldn’t bet on that. Plus, how many “sudden head movements” do you make everyday? Do you have your face punched a lot?

      To sum it up, I think you’re being too quick to judge. I’m not your nemesis, I don’t actively defend or promote Glass, but I think it’s too early to form such a strong opinion at this time.

      • Joaquim Amado Lopes

        1. Do you know many people that want to wear glasses just because they want to have something on their face?
        2. Subjective? Agree. Same as “cool”, “useful”, …
        3. Well, the whole device in on the same side. On the other there’s only the frame. But, I agree, anyone with a unit care to chime in?
        4. Get a pair of glasses/spectacles and glue a piece of dark paper 3mm in diameter on the upper outer side of one of the lenses. Wear them for a couple of hours and let us know your impressions.
        5. If you don’t like taking the phone out of the pocket all the time, how about a smartwatch? Too hard to look at your wrist all the time?
        6. I apoologize for English being my second language. And are you really arguing that wearing something in your face is more confortable than wearing something in your wrist?

        7. In case you own a dog, do you play with it? Are you around children on a regular basis? Do you ever run to catch a bus or a train? Do you ever travel on packed buses ou subway trains? Have you ever bumped against someone in the street? Have you ever had to avoid other people’s open umbrellas? Have you ever had to get out of the way of a cyclist? I guess the answer to all this questions is “no”.

        • http://petercast.net Peterson Silva

          1. I, for one, like wearing glasses. Besides, this is not glasses for the sake of something on your face. It’s glasses for the sake of technology and access to information, etc.
          4. People adapt to everything, mate. Have you heard of any of the explorers saying something like “I’m out, I can’t take this shit” or even a less radical “Ok, I really wish I could do away with this thing on the upper outer side” etc?
          5/6 – I’m arguing that it might as well be, yes. I’m saying that you can’t compare it until you’ve actually used it and, besides, a watch would lose any kind of photo-taking abilities. The experience isn’t the same.
          7 – I _teach_ children. I run to catch buses at times. I travel on these places. I have bumped against someone in the street, bla bla, I could go on. None of these are situations in which my actual glasses have flown off my face, and, give me a break, some glass promo videos have shown people playing with kids, dancing, bloody JUMPING on those gymnasts’ matress thingies. The point I bring again is: this is not a basement project. I highly doubt this was _built_ to be fragile, even though it might _look_ fragile. Seriously, man.

          • Joaquim Amado Lopes

            Well, you like wearing glasses so much that, apparently, they are glued to your face. I, for one, would rather not have to wear them. Ever.
            I understand the “for the sake of technology” but don’t think that will appeal to many people, particularly after the novelty wears off. BTW, do you see many people wearing headsets all the time because they don’t want to be bothered to take the phone out everytime they get a call?
            About the access to information, I repeat: smartphones and smartwatches. Except for the camera point of view (and the need for that is very subjective), both these devices can pack many more features and are much more confortable.
            And about the videos, I saw that one where a guy goes skydiving wearing Google Glasses and no protective goggles. Very convincing. And safe.
            .
            As I mentioned before, I see Google Glass as an interesting concept and will appeal to some people. But the idea that it will become ubicous with a lot of people wearing them all the time seems completly unrealistic.
            But we have to wait and see.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dawei.liu.180 Dawei Liu

    conclusion: totally useless except making people look in the void stupidly.