Google bans Glass from shareholder meeting

June 7, 2013
452

Google Glass banned

In an ironic twist, Google has decided to ban Glass from their annual shareholders meeting. Like so many bars and other establishments ahead of them, Google fears Glass may be a bit too invasive. If they were hoping to avoid controversy in Mountain View with regard to Glass, they failed.

To be fair, Google has also banned cell phones and other recording devices, so it’s not all about Glass. To further drive the point home, Google has made no claims that Glass doesn’t have the ability or functionality to be intrusive on privacy. Having recently banned facial recognition software from Glass, it’s clear that Google has perhaps failed to properly appreciate how pervasive the technology can be, or what developers have in mind when considering the device as a platform to program for.

It’s been a rough road travelled, and Glass isn’t even available to the public yet.

Like most things Glass related, this is a slippery slope. The device is presented as one that aims is to give timely updates and notifications, yet is banned for privacy concerns. Glass can do so much more than take pictures and video, but users have to be told how to act. Development is open, so long as it adheres to very repressive guidelines.

Banned before it even hits the streets, increasingly restrictive development guidelines, and now Glass has been locked out of a Google shareholder meeting. Google was right to disallow the use of Glass in their shareholder meeting, but public perception may not reflect that. It’s already not an every-man device, and the public suspicion continues. Hopefully, Google has a long-range design in mind for getting us interested in Glass, because many probably view it as a video taking device that can’t be used anywhere.

It’s been a rough road travelled, and Glass isn’t even available to the public yet. Development is the only way out of this hole, but Google keeps handing developers smaller shovels. Between those development guidelines, and public perception, it’s right to start asking where Google is going with this program.

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