Galaxy S4 sales slumped over summer, says research firm

October 16, 2013
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moto x vs galaxy s4 aa design galaxy s4

Unlike last year, when Samsung trumpeted the sales of the Galaxy S3, the Korean giant has been discreet about the market performance of its current flagship device, the Galaxy S4. Rumors suggest the reason for this silence is an unexpected sales slump that reportedly caused Samsung to accelerate the release of the Galaxy S5.

A newly released report from research firm Counterpoint seems to confirm the sales slump hypothesis. The firm released estimated sales data for August 2013, showing that Samsung sold 5 million units of the Galaxy S4 globally, a drop from the June peak of more than 7 million units. From the wording of the report, it appears that sales have also dropped in July, compared to June. August is historically a very slow month, says Counterpoint’s report, and sales may pick up again in the holiday season, thanks to promos and price cuts.

The research firm also ranked the top 10 selling handsets in August 2013, though we don’t understand why it listed the 16GB and the 32GB versions of the iPhone 5 separately. While the Galaxy S4 is on top, it’s probable that counting both versions of the iPhone together would change the leader.

  • Samsung Galaxy S4 International version
  • Apple iPhone 5-16GB
  • Apple iPhone 5-32GB
  • Nokia Asha 501
  • Samsung Galaxy Note II
  • Samsung Galaxy S III mini
  • Samsung Galaxy S III
  • Samsung Galaxy S4 Mini I9190
  • Nokia Asha 205
  • Nokia 105

The report claims that, overall, Samsung managed to offset the slowdown in Galaxy S4 sales by moving more units in the budget segment (under US$200). Counterpoint cut its estimate for the total number of Galaxy S4 units sold by the end of 2013, from 100% more than the Galaxy S3, to 80% more. For comparison, Samsung announced it shipped 40 million Galaxy S3 units in early January 2013.

The figures in this report refer to sell-through, which is the number of devices that were actually sold to customers, as opposed to sell-in, which is the number of devices shipped to retailers and carriers.

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