Galaxy S4 as easy to repair as Galaxy S3, iFixit teardown reveals

April 26, 2013
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A complete iFixit teardown of the Samsung Galaxy S4 smartphone is now available, revealing that the handset is very easy to repair.

This isn’t the first Galaxy S4 teardown that we’ve seen, with a previous one reaching the exact same conclusion. But iFixit’s Galaxy S4 dismantling procedure goes into greater detail than the previous attempt and features plenty of high-quality photos.

The publication awards the Galaxy S4 a repairability score of 8 out of 10, with 10 being easiest to repair. While we don’t encourage you to fix your devices yourself, those of you that will want to do that with broken Galaxy S4 units should know that almost all parts can be replaced individually, though some of them are “adhered into place,” making their replacement a bit harder.

Moreover, if something’s going to happen with the display, you’ll have to completely tear apart the handset to get to actually servicing the screen. Also worth noting is that the display is fused to the glass, and thus the cost of part replacements will increase.

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Coincidentally or not, the Galaxy S4 has the same fix score as its predecessor, which also got an 8 out of 10. In fact, when comparing score notes for the two handsets, you’ll notice that they’re virtually identical, with the Galaxy S3 presenting almost the same repair challenges as the Galaxy S4.

Compared to the HTC One (score 1 out of 10) and iPhone 5 (score 7 out of 10), the Galaxy S4 is the easiest to repair – again, not that you should do it yourself.

As you can see from the images, iFixit tore apart an AT&T version of the Galaxy S4 (packing a 1.9GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 processor, neatly hidden on the main board), and here are some interesting tidbits for the handset that don’t come up when talking about the handset:

  • The Smart Pause feature of the Galaxy S4 can be fooled with help of images, not as easy as you expect, but you can apparently do it
  • The location of the speaker on the Galaxy S4 – on the back of the handset – isn’t that appreciated: “This is the prime location for a speaker if your ears are attached to your hand while holding the device.
  • The IR sensors (placed on either side of the earpiece speaker) are what make AirView/Air Gesture work by picking up hand movement and comparing IR light reflected from it into each sensor in order to recognize movement
  • The component responsible for the Galaxy S4’s “super-sensitive touchscreen” that works with gloves also is a tiny Synaptics S5000B touchscreen controller.

In case you curious to see what makes the Galaxy S4 tick, head on over to iFixit’s complete teardown by following the Source link below. In case you want to see the handset in action, then check out our review, available right here (video above).

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